Tim Pool

Timothy Daniel Pool (born March 9, 1986) is an American journalist[3][4][5], YouTuber, and political commentator.[1] He is best known for livestreaming the Occupy Wall Street protests in 2011.[6][7]

Contents

  • 1 Personal life
  • 2 Career
    • 2.1 Reporting style
    • 2.2 Occupy Wall Street
    • 2.3 NONATO protests incident
    • 2.4 Reporting on immigration issues in Sweden
  • 3 Awards
  • 4 References
  • 5 External links

Personal life[edit]

Pool grew up with his three siblings in Chicago’s South Side[8] to a lower-middle-class family. He left school at age 14, educating himself at home through a correspondence program.[9]

Pool identifies his ancestry as Korean, Osage, German, and Irish.[10]

Career[edit]

Pool’s coverage has been carried and syndicated by multiple mainstream outlets including NBC, Reuters, Al Jazeera, and Time.[11][12] He was covered by Fast Company and Wired.[11][13][14] In 2013, Pool joined Vice Media producing and hosting content as well as developing new methods of reporting.[15] In 2014, he joined Fusion TV as Director of Media innovation and Senior Correspondent.[16][17][18]

Pool is the co-founder of Tagg.ly, a mobile application for watermarking photos and videos in order to allow copyrights to be withheld by users.[19]

Reporting style[edit]

Pool uses a live-chat stream to respond to questions from viewers while reporting.[20] Pool has also let his viewers direct him on where to shoot footage.[21] He modified a toy remote-controlled Parrot AR.Drone for aerial surveillance and modified software for live streaming into a system called DroneStream.[11][22][23]

Pool uses new technologies for coverage of events. In 2013, he reported on the Gezi Park protests in Istanbul with Google Glass.[24][15]

Occupy Wall Street[edit]

Pool’s use of livestreaming video and aerial drones during Occupy Wall Street protests prompted an article in The Guardian about excessive surveillance.[23] He has often been threatened for filming. In January 2012 he was physically accosted by a masked assailant.[25][26] Pool’s video taken during the protests was instrumental evidence in the acquittal of photographer Alexander Arbuckle, who had been arrested by the NYPD. The video showed that the arresting officer lied under oath, though no charges were filed.[27]

NONATO protests incident[edit]

While covering the NONATO protests at the 2012 Chicago summit, Pool, along with four others, was pulled over by a dozen Chicago police officers in unmarked vehicles. The group was removed from the vehicle at gunpoint, interrogated and searched. The official reason given by police was that the vehicle the team had been in matched a description. The group was released after approximately 10 minutes.[28]

Reporting on immigration issues in Sweden[edit]

In February 2017, Pool travelled to Sweden to investigate media reports of “no-go zones” and problems with refugees in the country. He did this independently of a later challenge from Infowars writer Paul Joseph Watson, who offered to pay for travel costs and accommodation for any reporter “to stay in crime ridden migrant suburbs of Malmö.”[29][30] Swedish police disputed Pool’s report that police had escorted him out, saying their shared routes were coincidental while agreeing that they had advised Pool to leave the Rinkeby area.[31]

Awards[edit]

Pool was nominated as a Time 100 personality in 2012.[32] The following year he received a Shorty Award in the “Best Journalist in Social Media” category.[33]

References[edit]

  • ^ a b Townsend, Allie (November 15, 2011). “Watch: Occupy Wall Street, Broadcasting Live”. newsfeed.time.com. Retrieved January 7, 2012..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  • ^ “Tim Pool Channel Analytics”. Social Blade. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  • ^ Rebecca Savransky (August 15, 2016). “Journalist pulls out of Milwaukee over escalating racial tensions”. The Hill. Retrieved March 12, 2019.
  • ^ Michelle Mark (August 15, 2016). “Prominent digital journalist pulls out of Milwaukee: ‘For those who are perceivably white, it is just not safe to be here'”. Business Insider. Retrieved March 12, 2019.
  • ^ Andrew Marantz (December 11, 2017). “The Live-Streamers Who Are Challenging Traditional Journalism”. The Hill. Retrieved March 12, 2019.
  • ^ Jim Fields (December 14, 2011). “The Media Messenger of Zuccotti Park”. Time Magazine. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  • ^ Martha DeGrasse (November 17, 2011). “Mobile phone streams Occupy Wall Street to the world”. TCRWireless. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  • ^ @Timcast (April 16, 2017). “@tariqnasheed Im a mixed race high school dropout from the southside of Chicago and we probably agree on many issues but you wont even give it a chance” (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  • ^ S.A., COPESA, Consorcio Periodistico de Chile. “Indignado en Wall St – La Tercera El Semanal – La Tercera Edición Impresa” (in Spanish). Archived from the original on February 27, 2015.
  • ^ @timcast (April 16, 2017). “@tariqnasheed Yea I’m korean, osage, german-irish” (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  • ^ a b c Sean Captain (January 6, 2012). “Threat Level: Livestreaming Journalists Want to Occupy the Skies With Cheap Drones”. Wired. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  • ^ Martin, Adam (January 5, 2012). “The Very Public Breakup of Occupy Wall Street’s Ustream Team”. The Atlantic Wire. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  • ^ Coscarelli, Joe (January 5, 2012). “Daily Intel: Occupy Wall Street’s Video Stars Are Feuding”. New York Magazine. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  • ^ Sean Captain (November 21, 2011). “Tim Pool And Henry Ferry: The Men Behind Occupy Wall Street’s Live Stream”. Fast Company. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  • ^ a b Dredge, Stuart (July 30, 2013). “How Vice’s Tim Pool used Google Glass to cover Istanbul protests” – via The Guardian.
  • ^ Steel, Emily (September 7, 2014). “Fusion Set to Name Director of Media Innovation” – via NYTimes.com.
  • ^ “Fusion Website”.
  • ^ “Fusion Brings On Tim Pool – Cision”. September 9, 2014.
  • ^ Sawers, Paul (April 29, 2014). “Vice’s Tim Pool Launches Tagg.ly Watermarking App”. The Next Web. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  • ^ “Occupy PressThink: Tim Pool”. Pressthink. November 20, 2011. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  • ^ Joanna (November 15, 2011). “Watch: Occupy Wall Street, Broadcasting Live”. Ustream.tv. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  • ^ The Big Picture RT (January 4, 2012). “Is OWS now fighting back w/Drones?” – via YouTube.
  • ^ a b Sharkey, Noel; Knuckey, Sarah (December 21, 2011). “Occupy Wall Street’s ‘occucopter’ – who’s watching whom?”. London: The Guardian. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  • ^ Martin, Adam (December 7, 2011). “Occupy Wall Street Has a Drone: The Occucopter”. The Atlantic Wire. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  • ^ Devereaux, Ryan (February 3, 2012). “Occupy Wall Street: ‘There’s a militant animosity bred by direct action'”. The Guardian. London.
  • ^ “Anarchists Think Photographers And Reporters Are The “Fu*king Enemy””. Archived from the original on May 12, 2012.
  • ^ Paul Levinson (2012). New New Media, 2nd edition. Pearson. p. 182.
  • ^ “Independent Journalists Detained at Gunpoint”.
  • ^ Bowden, George (February 21, 2017). “Paul Joseph Watson Comes Good On Twitter Offer To ‘Investigate Malmo, Sweden, Crimes'”. HuffPost UK. Retrieved March 14, 2018.
  • ^ “The man sent to ‘crime ridden’ Sweden by a right-wing journalist has reported his findings”. indy100. February 28, 2017.
  • ^ “Police dispute US journalist’s claim he was escorted out of Rinkeby”. thelocal.se. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  • ^ “The 2012 Time 100 Poll”. Time. March 29, 2012.
  • ^ “Shorty Awards 2013 honors Michelle Obama, Jimmy Kimmel”.
  • External links[edit]

    • Official website
    • Tim Pool’s channel on YouTube


    1993 kid sexual assault complaints against Michael Jackson

    Evan Chandler’s accusations of Michael Jackson sexually abusing Jordan Chandler
    This article is about the first allegations of child sexual abuse made against Michael Jackson. For the later allegations, see Trial of Michael Jackson.

    In mid-1993, Evan Chandler, a dentist, accused American singer Michael Jackson of sexually abusing his 13-year-old son, Jordan Neil “Jordy” Chandler. The relationship between Jackson and Jordan had begun in May 1992; Chandler initially encouraged the friendship.[1] The friendship became well known as the tabloid media reported that Jackson had become a member of the Chandler family. In 1993, Chandler confronted his ex-wife June, who had custody of Jordan, with suspicions that their son had been in an inappropriate relationship with Jackson, but June dismissed his worries.[2][3] Chandler threatened to go public with the evidence he claimed to have.[3]

    Jackson asked his lawyer Bert Fields to intervene.[2] On July 15, Mathis Abrams, a psychologist, sent Chandler’s attorney Barry Rothman a letter stating there was “reasonable suspicion” of sexual abuse. He wrote that if it had been a real case,[clarification needed] he would be required by law to contact the Los Angeles County Department of Children’s Services.[4] On August 4, Chandler and Jordan met with Jackson and Anthony Pellicano, Jackson’s private investigator, and Chandler read out Abrams’ letter. He then opened negotiations to resolve the issue with a financial settlement.[5][6] Chandler and Rothman had rejected a $350,000 offer from Jackson. On August 16, Jackson’s attorney notified Rothman that he would file papers to force Chandler to return Jordan to allow him to go on[clarification needed] Jackson’s Dangerous World Tour.

    On the day Jackson began the third leg of his tour, news of the allegations broke to the public and received worldwide media attention. Jackson cancelled the remainder of the tour due to health problems arising from the scandal. In January 1994, Jackson reached a financial settlement for $23,000,000 with the Chandlers and in September a criminal investigation was closed. The allegations affected his public image and commercial standing, and several endorsement deals were canceled, including Jackson’s decade-long Pepsi endorsement. Similar allegations were made by other parties in the following decades, leading to a trial in which Jackson was found not guilty. In 2009, five months after Jackson’s death, Evan Chandler committed suicide in his apartment in Jersey City.

    Contents

    • 1 Allegations
      • 1.1 Use of sedatives
      • 1.2 Negotiations
      • 1.3 Allegations made public and investigation
      • 1.4 Allegation by LaToya Jackson
      • 1.5 Lisa Marie Presley
      • 1.6 Jackson’s health
      • 1.7 Strip search
      • 1.8 Jackson’s response
    • 2 Media reaction
    • 3 Civil lawsuit
      • 3.1 Settlement
    • 4 Closure of investigation
    • 5 Aftermath
      • 5.1 Effect on Jackson’s career
      • 5.2 Further allegations
    • 6 References
    • 7 Works cited

    Allegations[edit]

    Jackson’s Neverland Ranch home, where the sexual abuse was alleged to have taken place

    Jackson became friends with Jordan Chandler and his family after a meeting in May 1992, as he was a fan of Jackson.[7] Their friendship became so close that the National Enquirer ran a featured story with the title “Michael’s New Adopted Family”. The story implied that Jackson had “stolen” the boy from his estranged father, Evan Chandler, a dentist. Chandler was jealous over Jackson’s influence on his son.[8] According to biographer J. Randy Taraborrelli, Chandler asked, “Look, are you having sex with my son?” When Jackson said no, Chandler’s opinion of Jackson changed.[8][clarification needed]

    Jackson invited Jordan, his stepsister and his mother to visit his Neverland Ranch on the weekends. They would also take trips to Las Vegas and Florida.[7] These trips interfered with Jordan’s scheduled visits with his father, with Jordan preferring to visit Neverland.[9] By mid-1993, it was revealed[how?] that Jackson had children sleep in his bed with him at Neverland, which attracted media scrutiny.[10][11]

    In May 1993, when Jackson and Jordan stayed with Chandler, Chandler urged Jackson to spend more time with his son, and suggested that Jackson build an addition to the house so that Jackson could stay there.[1] After the zoning department said this could not be built, Chandler suggested that Jackson build him a new home.[1]

    That month, Jordan and June flew with Jackson to Monaco for the World Music Awards.[1][9] According to June’s lawyer, Michael Freeman, “Evan began to get jealous of the involvement and felt left out.”[1] Upon their return, Chandler was pleased with a five-day visit from Jackson, during which Jackson slept in a room with Jordan and his stepbrother.[1] Chandler said this is when he became suspicious of sexual misconduct by Jackson, although he said that Jackson and Jordan were clothed when he saw them in bed together, and has never claimed to have witnessed sexual misconduct.[12]

    On July 2, 1993, in a private telephone conversation, Chandler was recorded[how?] saying:

    .mw-parser-output .templatequote{overflow:hidden;margin:1em 0;padding:0 40px}.mw-parser-output .templatequote .templatequotecite{line-height:1.5em;text-align:left;padding-left:1.6em;margin-top:0}

    There was no reason why [Jackson] had to stop calling me … I picked the nastiest son of a bitch I could find [Chandler’s lawyer Barry Rothman], all he wants to do is get this out in the public as fast as he can, as big as he can and humiliate as many people as he can. He’s nasty, he’s mean, he’s smart and he’s hungry for publicity. Everything’s going to a certain plan that isn’t just mine. Once I make that phone call, this guy is going to destroy everybody in sight in any devious, nasty, cruel way that he can do it. I’ve given him full authority to do that. Jackson is an evil guy, he is worse than that and I have the evidence to prove it. If I go through with this, I win big-time. There’s no way I lose. I will get everything I want and they will be destroyed forever … Michael’s career will be over.[13]

    In the same conversation, when asked how this would affect his son, Chandler replied:

    That’s irrelevant to me … It will be a massacre if I don’t get what I want. It’s going to be bigger than all us put together … This man [Jackson] is going to be humiliated beyond belief … He will not sell one more record.[13]

    The recorded conversation was a critical aspect of Jackson’s defense against the allegations made against him. He and his supporters argued that he was the victim of a jealous father whose only goal was to extort money from him.[13] In October 1994, Mary A. Fischer of GQ magazine reported it was Chandler who initially accused Jackson of molesting his son, before he demanded a screenwriting deal from Jackson instead of going to the police.[14][15]

    Use of sedatives[edit]

    According to Taraborrelli, Chandler was forced to admit that he had used the controversial sedative sodium amytal when he extracted a tooth from Jordan in early August.[16] Sodium amytal is a barbiturate that puts people in a hypnotic state when injected intravenously. Studies done in 1952 debunked the drug as a truth serum[clarification needed] and demonstrated that it enabled false memories to be implanted.[5]

    Dr. Phillip Resnick, a Cleveland psychiatrist,[17] said it was “a psychiatric medication” and “People will say things under sodium amytal that are blatantly untrue”.[5] In May 1994, in Napa County, California, Gary Ramona won a lawsuit against his daughter’s therapist and the psychiatrist who had given her sodium amytal.[5][18] The psychiatrist claimed the drug helped Ramona’s daughter remember specific details of sexual molestation by Ramona, but a court brief written by Martin Orne, a University of Pennsylvania psychiatrist who pioneered research of hypnosis and sodium amytal, stated that the drug is “not useful in ascertaining ‘truth’ . . . The patient becomes sensitive and receptive to suggestions due to the context and to the comments of the interviewers.”[18] This was the first successful legal challenge to the “repressed memory phenomenon”.[5]

    Dr. Kenneth Gottlieb, a San Francisco psychiatrist, said: “It’s absolutely a psychiatric drug … I would never want to use a drug that tampers with a person’s unconscious unless there was no other drug available. And I would not use it without resuscitating equipment, in case of allergic reaction, and only with an M.D. anesthesiologist present.”[5] According to Dr. John Yagiela, coordinator of the anesthesia and pain control department of the UCLA School of Dentistry, “It’s unusual for it to be used [for pulling a tooth]” and “better, safer alternatives are available.”[5]

    On May 3, 1994, KCBS-TV reported that Chandler claimed the drug was used for tooth extraction and that the allegations came out[clarification needed] while Jordan was under the influence of the drug.[5] Mark Torbiner, the dental anesthesiologist who administered the drug, told GQ that if sodium amytal was used, “it was for dental purposes”.[5] According to Diane Dimond of Hard Copy, Torbiner’s records show that Robinul and Vistarol was administered instead of sodium amytal.[19] The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration was investigating Torbiner’s administration of drugs in house calls, where he mostly gave patients morphine and Demerol.[5] His credentials with the Board of Dental Examiners indicated that he was restricted by law to administering drugs solely for dental-related procedures, but he had not adhered to those restrictions.[20] For instance, he had given general anesthetic to Barry Rothman during hair-transplant procedures.[20] Torbiner had introduced Chandler and Rothman in 1991, when Rothman needed dental work.[5]

    Negotiations[edit]

    Over the next couple of months, the parties of Jackson and Chandler engaged in unsuccessful out-of-court negotiations. Chandler and his legal team asked for $20 million, or threatened to take the dispute to a criminal court.[6] Jackson refused, saying, “No way in hell”. A few weeks later, Jackson’s legal team gave a counter-offer of $1 million, which was declined by Chandler.[6] Pellicano said he made the offers in an attempt to catch the Chandler’s negotiating and recorded one of the telephone calls to Rothman to demonstrate this.[21] Chandler lowered his request to $15 million. Jackson refused and lowered his offer to $350,000, which Chandler refused. With both sides unable to reach an agreement, Chandler decided to take it to court.[6][22]

    Chandler took Jordan to a psychiatrist, Dr. Mathis Abrams. Over a three-hour session with Abrams, Jordan said he had had a sexual relationship with Jackson that went on for several months, and which included kissing, masturbation and oral sex. He repeated these allegations to police and gave a detailed description of what he alleged was Jackson’s penis.[6][23]

    Allegations made public and investigation[edit]

    On August 18, the Los Angeles Police Department’s Sexually Exploited Child Unit began a criminal investigation into Jackson. The same day, June told police that she did not believe Jackson had molested her son.[11][24] On August 21, a search warrant was issued, allowing police to search Neverland Ranch. Police questioned 30 children who were friends of Jackson, who all stated that Jackson was not a child molester.[10][24] A police officer involved in the investigation told The Los Angeles Times that no evidence (medical, photographic or video) could be found that would support a criminal filing.[24]

    On the day the allegations were made public, August 24, Jackson began the third leg of his Dangerous World Tour, in Bangkok. That same day, Jackson’s investigator held a press conference accusing Chandler of trying to extort $20 million. He did not mention that Jackson had made several counter-offers.[10][24] On August 25, Jackson’s young friends Brett Barnes and Wade Robson held a press conference in which they stated that they had slept in the same bed as Jackson, but nothing sexual in nature had occurred.[25][26] Jackson’s family held another press conference, saying it was their “unequivocal belief” that Michael was a victim of an attempt to take advantage of his fame and wealth.[25][26]

    The police began an investigation into Chandler, and found that he was $68,400 behind in his child support payments, despite being well-paid as a dentist.[7] On November 8, police searched the Jackson family home, Hayvenhurst, but found nothing of importance.[10][27] They increased their efforts after no supporting evidence was found, and after questioning almost 30 children and their families, all of whom said Jackson had done nothing wrong.[28][29] Officers flew to the Philippines to interview two ex-housekeepers who had sold a molestation story to the tabloids but decided it lacked credibility.[28] Several parents also complained of aggressive investigative techniques by the police; for example, they claimed the police frightened their children with lies such as “we have nude photos of you”,[30][28] and told parents their children had been molested even though their children had denied it.[28]

    According to internal reports from the LA County DCFS at the time, Chandler’s story remained largely consistent but dates, places, times and some details were inconsistent.[31] According to reports, the DCFS had investigated Jackson beginning in August 1993 with the Chandler allegation and again in 2003. The LAPD and DCFS found no credible evidence of abuse or sexual misconduct.[32][33]

    Allegation by LaToya Jackson[edit]

    In the winter of 1993, Jackson’s sister La Toya Jackson, who had been estranged from the family and not seen him for several years, claimed that Jackson was a pedophile. La Toya stated: “I cannot and will not be a silent collaborator in his crimes against young children … Forget about the superstar, forget about the icon. If he was any other 35-year-old man who was sleeping with little boys, you wouldn’t like this guy.”[34] She claimed that checks had been made out to several boys and that Jackson’s own physical abuse as a child had turned him into an abuser.[34][35] She later claimed[when?] that Jackson had tried to kidnap and kill her.[35]

    LaToya claimed to have proof of Jackson’s pedophilia and offered to disclose it for $500,000. A bidding war between US and UK tabloids began, but fell through when they realized that her revelations were not what she had claimed.[34][clarification needed] The rest of the family disowned her, and in later years she insisted she had been forced to make the allegations by her then-husband Jack Gordon for financial gain.[34] Just prior to making the allegations, her husband had been arrested for assaulting her.[36] By the turn of the millennium Jackson had forgiven his sister.[34]

    Lisa Marie Presley[edit]

    Jackson met Lisa Marie Presley around May 26, 1974, during a Jackson 5 engagement in Lake Tahoe. Her father, Elvis Presley, was closing a two week engagement at the Sahara Tahoe while the Jackson 5 were just about to begin one.[25] In November 1992, Jackson was reconnected with Presley through a mutual friend, and they talked almost every day by telephone.[37] As the child sexual abuse accusations became public, he became dependent on Presley for emotional support; she was concerned about his faltering health.[38] She explained, “I believed he didn’t do anything wrong and that he was wrongly accused and yes I started falling for him. I wanted to save him. I felt that I could do it.”[39] She described him in one call as high, incoherent and delusional.[38] He proposed to her over the phone towards the fall of 1993, saying, “If I asked you to marry me, would you do it?”[38] The marriage was, in her words, “a married couple’s life … that was sexually active”.[40] They divorced less than two years later, but remained friends.[41]

    Jackson’s health[edit]

    Jackson began taking painkillers, Valium, Xanax and Ativan to deal with the stress of the allegations.[38] Within a few months of the allegations becoming news, he had lost approximately 10 pounds and stopped eating.[42] According to Jackson, he had a tendency to stop eating when “really upset or hurt” and his friend Elizabeth Taylor had to make him eat: “She took the spoon and would put it into my mouth.”[43] He said that he eventually became unconscious and had to be fed intravenously.[43]

    In a court deposition unrelated to the alleged child abuse,[clarification needed] Jackson appeared drowsy, lacked concentration and slurred while speaking. He said he could not remember the dates of his album releases or the names of people he had worked with, and took several minutes to name some of his recent albums.[44] His health had deteriorated such that he canceled the remainder of his tour and flew with Taylor and her husband to London. When Jackson arrived at the airport, he had to be held up. He was rushed to the home of Elton John’s manager and afterwards to a clinic.[27][45] When he was searched for drugs on entry, 18 vials of medicine were found in a suitcase. Jackson booked the whole fourth floor of the clinic, and was put on a Valium IV to wean him from painkillers.[11][27][45] His spokesperson told reporters that Jackson was “barely able to function adequately on an intellectual level”.[45] While in the clinic, he took part in group and one-on-one therapy sessions.[27][45]

    Strip search[edit]

    In December 1993, Jackson was served with a warrant for a strip search, as police wanted to verify Jordan Chandler’s description of Jackson’s private anatomy.[34] The order stated that officers were to examine, photograph and videotape Jackson’s entire body, “including his penis, anus, hips, [and] buttocks”.[34][46][47] The police were looking for discoloration or any other signs of vitiligo that Jordan had spoken about, or any other skin disorder. Refusal to comply would be used in court as an indication of guilt.[46]

    The search took place on December 20, 1993, at Jackson’s ranch. Those present for the prosecution were District Attorney Tom Sneddon, a detective, a photographer, and a doctor. Those present on behalf of Jackson were his two attorneys, a physician, a detective, a bodyguard and a photographer.[34] The attorneys and Sneddon agreed to leave the room when the examination took place. At Jackson’s insistence, the prosecution detective also left. In an emotional state, Jackson stood on a platform in the middle of the room and disrobed. The search lasted for approximately 25 minutes. He was never touched.[34]

    Reports vary on whether the photographs of Jackson corroborated Jordan’s allegations. Reuters reported that an unidentified source informed them on January 27, 1994, that “photos of Michael Jackson’s genitalia do not match description given by the boy”,[48][49] which was reported in USA Today on January 28.[50][51] However, according to child sexual abuse consultant Bill Dworin, one of the lead detectives on the case, Jordan’s description comported with the photos taken of Jackson’s genitalia.[52] Dr. Richard Strick, who conducted the examination of Jackson’s genitals, said “I was told later that the photos and description absolutely matched”.[53] Sneddon later stated that “the photographs reveal a mark on the right side of Defendant’s penis at about the same relative location as the dark blemish located by Jordan Chandler on his drawing of Defendant’s erect penis”, and that “Chandler’s graphic representation of the discolored area on Defendant’s penis is substantially corroborated by the photographs”.[54] Sergeant Gary Spiegel, the sheriff’s photographer, claims he observed a dark spot on the lower side of Jackson’s penis.[55]

    Jordan claimed that Jackson was circumcised.[15][34][56] However, Jackson’s autopsy report showed that he had not been circumcised and his foreskin appeared naturally intact, with no signs of having been restored from a circumcision.[57] Taraborrelli claims that Jordan correctly noted patchy colored skin on his buttocks, short pubic hair, and testicles marked pink and brown;[58] however, initially investigators claimed Chandler said Jackson had splotches on his genitals a color “similar to the color of his face” rather than pink and brown.[56]

    On February 10, 1993,[59] Jackson had revealed in a televised interview that he had vitiligo, a skin disorder that destroys skin pigmentation and creates blotches, and that he used make-up to even out his skin.[60] The interview was watched by 90 million, and after it aired, expert information on vitiligo was widely shared in the media.[60] According to private investigator Anthony Pellicano, who questioned Jordan in July 1993 after hearing Evan’s taped phone call, Jordan denied that he ever saw Jackson’s body but said he did lift his shirt once to show him the blotches on his skin.[6] Investigators made a probe into Jackson’s history, including family interviews, to see if he had undergone procedures to alter his body’s appearance, as the grand jury felt there was no clear match with Jordan’s description.[61]

    Jackson’s response[edit]

    On December 22 1993, Jackson responded to events for the first time via satellite from Neverland Ranch:

    As you may already know, after my tour ended I remained out of the country undergoing treatment for a dependency on pain medication … There have been many disgusting statements made recently concerning allegations of improper conduct on my part. These statements about me are totally false … I will say I am particularly upset by the handling of the mass—matter by the incredible, terrible mass media. At every opportunity, the media has dissected and manipulated these allegations to reach their own conclusions. I ask all of you to wait and hear the truth before you label or condemn me. Don’t treat me like a criminal, because I am innocent. I have been forced to submit to a dehumanizing and humiliating examination … It was the most humiliating ordeal of my life, one that no person should ever have to suffer … But if this is what I have to endure to prove my innocence, my complete innocence, so be it.[10][11]

    A poll at the time, conducted by A Current Affair, found that nearly 75 percent of Americans believed Jackson was telling the truth.[62]

    Media reaction[edit]

    Most of the information available on the allegations was released (officially or unofficially) by the prosecution and unchallenged by Jackson.[15] Jackson was largely portrayed as guilty by the media,[15] which used sensational headlines implying guilt[25] when the content itself did not support the headline,[24] purchased stories of his alleged criminal activity[63] leaked material from the police investigation,[7] and deliberately used unflattering photographs.[25]

    Two weeks after the allegations were reported, the headline “Michael Jackson: A Curtain Closes” reflected the attitude of most tabloid media.[64] The New York Post ran the headline “Peter Pan or pervert”.[25] In a piece for Hard Copy, Diane Dimond—a journalist who spent the next 15 years trying to prove Jackson was a pedophile—ran a story stating it had acquired “new documents in the criminal investigation of Michael Jackson, and they are chilling; they contain the name of child movie actor Macaulay Culkin”. In fact, the document stated that Culkin denied being abused by Jackson.[24]

    Two tabloid media bought confidential leaked documents from the LAPD for $20,000.[7] A number of Jackson’s former employees—most of whom had worked at Neverland—sold stories alleged prior sexual misconduct on Jackson’s part, instead of reporting their claims to police. One couple asked for $100,000, claiming that Jackson had sexually caressed Culkin. For a fee of $500,000, they would also allege that Jackson put his hands down Culkin’s pants. Culkin strongly denied the allegation, and did so again in court during Jackson’s 2005 trial.[63]

    A former security guard made various allegations about Jackson, saying he was fired because he “knew too much”,[65] and alleged that he was ordered by Jackson to destroy a photo of a naked boy. Instead of reporting this to police, he sold the story to Hard Copy for $150,000.[65] Afterwards, Jackson’s maid, Branca Francia, alleged that she “quit in disgust” after seeing Jackson in a shower with a child, but did not inform the police. It emerged that Francia had been fired in 1991, but nevertheless sold her story to Hard Copy for $20,000.[65]

    When Jackson left the US to go into drug rehabilitation, the Daily Mirror (UK) held a “Spot the Jacko” contest, offering readers a trip to Disney World if they could correctly predict where he would appear next.[27] A Daily Express headline read “Drug treatment star faces life on the run”, while a News of the World headline said Jackson was a fugitive. These tabloids also falsely alleged that Jackson had traveled to Europe to have cosmetic surgery that would make him unrecognizable.[27] Geraldo Rivera set up a mock trial, with a jury made up of audience members, even though Jackson had not been charged with a crime.[66]

    Civil lawsuit[edit]

    On September 14, 1993, Jordan Chandler and his parents filed a civil lawsuit against Jackson.[67] In late 1993, district attorneys in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles counties convened grand juries to assess whether criminal charges should be filed.[68] By 1994, prosecution departments in California had spent $2 million and the grand juries had questioned 200 witnesses, but Jordan’s allegations could not be corroborated.[69]

    On January 4, 1994, Chandler’s attorney, Larry Feldman, filed a motion for the photos from Jackson’s strip search, saying Jackson’s attorneys and the L.A. district attorney had refused to give him copies.[70] A few weeks later, Feldman petitioned the court for access to Jackson’s finances, arguing that Jackson’s wealth would give him an unfair advantage in court. One adviser to Jackson said: “You can take pictures of Michael’s dick and he’s not gonna like it, but once you start trying to figure out how much money he has, that’s where he stops playing around.”[69]

    Jackson and his lawyers filed a motion for Superior Court Judge David M. Rothman to postpone the civil case until the criminal investigation concluded.[30] It is legal to postpone a civil lawsuit past the criminal statute of limitations as a lawsuit can still be filed past that date.[71] Additionally, the constitutional right to a speedy trial only applies to criminal cases, not civil cases.[72] Feldman filed a counter-motion, saying the delay would hurt Jordan’s chances for recovery and make it more difficult to gather evidence.[30] On November 23, Judge Rothman accepted Feldman’s motion and set March 21, 1994, as the start date for the civil trial.[73]

    Rothman ordered Jackson’s deposition scheduled before the end of January 1994, but said he might reconsider if Jackson was indicted on criminal charges.[74] Jackson agreed to be deposed on January 18.[74] His attorneys said he was eager to testify, but also said they might oppose the deposition if criminal charges were filed or were still under consideration on his deposition date.[74] They said if charges were filed, they would want the criminal trial to go first.[74] However, when authorities notified Jackson’s lawyers that they expected their investigation to continue at least through February, Jackson’s team failed to win a delay of the civil case.[75] Jackson’s lawyers also lost a motion to prevent Feldman from turning over information (e.g. from the civil deposition) to prosecutors pursuing possible criminal charges.[75]

    The concerns about a civil trial during an ongoing criminal investigation, and about the prosecutor’s access to the plaintiff’s information in the civil trial, stemmed from Jackson’s Fifth Amendment rights.[72] As two grand juries had deemed there was insufficient evidence for charges as of January 1,[69] the prosecution might have been able to form the elements of a criminal case around the defense strategy in the civil trial, creating a situation akin to double jeopardy.[76][77]

    On January 24, 1994, prosecutors announced that they would not bring charges against Chandler for attempted extortion, as Jackson’s camp had been slow to report the extortion claim to the police and had tried to negotiate a settlement with Chandler for several weeks.[78] Evan had made his demand for a financial settlement on August 4, 1993, and the Jackson camp filed extortion charges against Evan and his attorney, Rothman, in late August 1993.[28] After tape recordings supporting the extortion claim were released to the media on August 30,[79] a lawyer for Jackson said they had not gone to the police earlier because “It was our hope that this would all go away. We tried to keep it as much in-house as we could.”[80]

    In the extortion investigation, a search warrant was never sought to search the homes and offices of Chandler and Rothman, and no grand jury convened when both men refused police interviews.[68] In contrast, the police had searched Jackson’s residences solely based on Jordan’s allegations reported by a psychiatrist with no particular expertise in child sexual abuse,[29][81] and taken lengths to interview or intimidate witnesses.[30][28]

    Settlement[edit]

    While Jackson sought medical help for his faltering health, his legal team and friends, such as Presley and Taylor, took control of his defense and finances.[42] Jackson’s legal team would meet three times a week at Taylor’s home to discuss the case.[42] Eventually, Presley, Taylor, and Jackson’s team agreed that Jackson was too sick to endure a lengthy trial, and that he should settle out of court.[45]

    The lawsuit was settled on January 25, 1994,[82] with $15,331,250 to be held in a trust fund for Jordan,[83] $1.5 million for each of his parents, and $5 million for the family’s lawyer, for a total of approximately $23 million.[84] Another source showed Feldman was to receive $3 million based on a September 1993 retainer, for a total of $21 million.[85] According to a motion passed to Judge Melville in 2004, it was Chandler who initiated the settlement with Jackson’s insurer.[86]

    Jackson’s insurance company “negotiated and paid the settlement, over the protests of Mr. Jackson and his personal legal counsel” and was “the source of the settlement amounts”, as noted in a 2005 memorandum in People v. Jackson.[87] The memorandum also noted that “an insurance carrier has the right to settle claims covered by insurance where it decides settlement is expedient and the insured may not interfere with nor prevent such settlements”, as established by a number of precedents in California.[87] Defeating the right would involve convincing a court with the power to overrule the precedent that the earlier decision was either wrongly decided or more often, “clearly” wrong (depending on the criteria of the court)[88] or the court must be convinced to distinguish the case.[89] That is, to make the ruling narrower than that in the precedent due to some difference in facts between the current and precedent case while supporting the result reached in the earlier case.[89]

    In 2004, Jackson’s attorney Thomas Mesereau said: “People who intended to earn millions of dollars from [Jackson’s] record and music promotions did not want negative publicity from these lawsuits interfering with their profits. Michael Jackson now regrets making these payments. These settlements were entered into with one primary condition – that condition was that Mr. Jackson never admitted any wrongdoing. Mr. Jackson always denied doing anything wrong … Mr. Jackson now realizes the advice he received was wrong.”[90] Jackson explained why he had settled: “I wanted to go on with my life. Too many people had already been hurt. I want to make records. I want to sing. I want to perform again … It’s my talent. My hard work. My life. My decision.”[69] He also wanted to avoid a “media circus”.[91]

    Although some perceived the settlement as an admission of guilt, the settlement agreement specifically stated that Jackson admitted no wrongdoing and no liability.[84][92] Legally, a settlement cannot be used as evidence of guilt in future civil and criminal cases.[93] The settlement payment was “for alleged personal injuries arising out of claims of negligence and not for claims of intentional or wrong acts of sexual molestation.”[85][94] In the settlement, both parties agreed they would not speak about the case details in public but it did not prevent the Chandlers from testifying in a criminal trial or sharing information with authorities in a criminal investigation.[95] The settlement document states there is no admission of wrongdoing on Jackson’s part and no admission of molestation or immodesty[95] and that under no circumstances shall any payment be withheld from the complainants, even if they were to testify against Jackson.[95]

    The Chandlers’ lawyer, Larry Feldman, said that “nobody bought anybody’s silence”.[96] Bribery to not testify in a trial is a felony according to California Penal Code 138.[97] Receiving such a bribe is also a felony according to this law.[97]

    Closure of investigation[edit]

    District Attorney Gil Garcetti said that the settlement did not affect criminal prosecution and that the investigation was ongoing.[98] Jordan Chandler was interviewed after the settlement by detectives seeking evidence of child molestation, but no criminal charges were filed.[99] A Santa Barbara County grand jury disbanded on May 2 1994 without indicting Jackson, while a Los Angeles County grand jury continued to investigate the sexual abuse allegations.[100][101]

    The Chandlers stopped co-operating with the criminal investigation around July 6, 1994.[102] The police never pressed criminal charges.[91] Citing a lack of evidence without Jordan’s testimony, the state closed its investigation on September 22, 1994.[69][103] According to the grand juries, the evidence presented by the Santa Barbara police and the LAPD was not convincing enough to indict Jackson or subpoena him,[69][100] even though grand juries can indict the accused purely on hearsay evidence.[104][105] According to a 1994 report by Variety, a source in contact with the grand juries said that none of the witnesses had produced anything to directly implicate Jackson.[73] According to a 1994 report by Showbiz Today, one of the 1994 grand jurors claimed they “did not hear any damaging testimony” during the hearings.[106]

    Aftermath[edit]

    A week after the lawsuit settlement was announced on January 25, 1994,[107] L.A. District Attorney Gil Garcetti announced that he supported amending a law that prohibits forcing people who say they have been sexually assaulted to testify in criminal proceedings.[108][109] The amendment, introduced into the state assembly the week of February 7, would have immediately allowed Garcetti to compel Jordan to testify.[109]

    Around the same time, Santa Barbara police interviewed the 13-year-old son of one of Jackson’s former maids who had told them her son had spent time with Jackson. After he repeatedly denied being abused, they arranged for him to see a therapist.[108] In a deposition, his mother said she had asked the police about who she could speak to about her concerns about Jackson spending private time with her son. According to the mother, they arranged for her and her son to see separate therapists.[108][109]

    On April 11, 1994, the grand jury session in Santa Barbara was extended by 90 days to allow Sneddon to gather more evidence. Prosecution sources said they were frustrated in their grand jury probe, failing to find direct evidence of the molestation charges.[110] The final grand jury disbanded without returning an indictment against Jackson.[111]

    Three years later, Jordan Chandler’s account of the relationship was detailed in a book by journalist Victor M. Gutierrez. The book was said to be based on a diary Jordan had kept at the time and included details of alleged sexual encounters with Jackson.[10] In 1995, Jackson filed a civil suit against Gutierrez for slander unrelated to the book; the jury found in Jackson’s favor, awarding him $2.7 million in damages. However, the judgement does not refute the allegations contained in the book.[112] In 1996, Evan Chandler sued Jackson for around $60 million, claiming Jackson had breached an agreement never to discuss the case. In 1999, a court ruled in Jackson’s favor and threw out the lawsuit.[10]

    Jordan Chandler legally emancipated himself from his parents in 1994 at age 14.[when?][113] In 2006, Jordan accused Evan of attacking him with a barbell, choking him and spraying his face with mace. The charges were dropped.[114] On November 5, 2009, fourteen weeks after Jackson’s death, Evan Chandler was found dead following an apparent suicide.[115]

    Music journalist Charles Thomson noted a continued media bias against Jackson after Chandler’s suicide. Thomson said he was contacted by a British tabloid to supply information about the 1993 allegations, only to have them replace his carefully researched information with the misinformation he advised them to avoid.[15] According to Thomson, when Jackson’s FBI file was released the following month, the media reported that it created the impression of guilt, even though the file supported his innocence.[15] He noted that Gene Simmons’ allegations in 2010 about Jackson molesting children received over a hundred times more coverage than his interview with Jackson’s long-time guitarist, Jennifer Batten, who rebutted Simmons’ claims.[15]

    Effect on Jackson’s career[edit]

    Jackson’s commercial appeal and public image declined in the wake of the allegations. The government of Dubai barred him from performing in response to an anonymous pamphlet campaign that attacked him as immoral.[116] After performing 24 shows of the third leg of the Dangerous Tour,[citation needed] Jackson canceled the remainder of the tour, citing exhaustion.[117] He backed out of a deal to create a song and video to tie-in with the film Addams Family Values, returning an estimated $5 million,[117] and a brand of fragrances was canceled because of Jackson’s drug problems.[118] PepsiCo also ended their ten-year partnership with him, causing some fans to boycott the company.[44] According to conflicting sources, Jackson agreed to compose music for the video game Sonic the Hedgehog 3, but left the project and went uncredited, possibly due to the allegations.[119]

    Jackson produced a special show for cable-network HBO, For One Night Only, to be recorded in front of a special invited audience at New York City’s Beacon Theater for transmission on HBO in December 1995. The shows were canceled after Jackson collapsed at the theater on December 6 during rehearsals. Jackson was admitted overnight to Beth Israel Medical Center North. The shows were never rescheduled. The following year, Jackson began the HIStory World Tour. Despite the show’s success, Jackson’s only concerts in the USA were two shows at the Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. Jackson never performed another world tour.[120][relevant? – discuss] Jackson completed the video once planned for Addams Family Values and released it as Ghosts, with a framing story about an eccentric maestro who entertains children and is pursued by a bigoted local official.[121]

    Jackson’s album HIStory, released shortly after the allegations, “creates an atmosphere of paranoia,” according to one writer.[122] Its content focuses on the public struggles Jackson went through prior to its production. In the songs “Scream”, “Tabloid Junkie”, and “You Are Not Alone”, Jackson expresses his anger and hurt at the media.[123] In the ballad “Stranger in Moscow”, he laments his “swift and sudden fall from grace”.[122][123] In “D.S.”, he attacks a character identified as Tom Sneddon, the District Attorney that requested his strip search. He describes the person as a white supremacist who wanted to “get my ass, dead or alive”. Sneddon said: “I have not, shall we say, done him the honor of listening to it, but I’ve been told that it ends with the sound of a gunshot.”[124]

    Further allegations[edit]

    Main article: Trial of Michael Jackson

    On December 18, 2003, Jackson was charged with seven counts of child sexual abuse and two counts of administering an intoxicating agent to commit a child sexual abuse felony against Gavin Arvizo.[125] Jackson denied the allegations. Sneddon again led the prosecution.[126]

    The People v. Jackson trial began in Santa Maria, California, on January 31, 2005.[127] The judge allowed testimony about past allegations, including the 1993 case, to establish whether the defendant had a propensity to commit certain crimes.[91][128] However, Jordan Chandler had left the country to avoid testifying.[129] Mesereau later said: “The prosecutors tried to get [Chandler] to show up and he wouldn’t. If he had, I had witnesses who were going to come in and say he told them it never happened and that he would never talk to his parents again for what they made him say.”[129]

    June Chandler testified that she had not spoken to her son in 11 years. During her testimony, she claimed that she could not remember being counter-sued by Jackson and said that she had never heard of her own attorney.[129] However, she said she never witnessed any molestation.[129] Jackson was found not guilty of all charges on June 13, 2005.[129]

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  • ^ “Jackson Grand Jury Disbanded. 1994.” Archived April 28, 2015, at the Wayback Machine Transcript of report by anchor Jim Moret. Showbiz Today|May 2, 1994|Retrieved June 16, 2014.
  • ^ Campbell, p.159
  • ^ a b c Campbell, pp.163–164
  • ^ a b c Wickham, DeWayne (February 7, 1994). “Officials desperate to nail Michael Jackson (abstract, full text available for pay)”. USA Today. McLean, Va. Archived November 6, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  • ^ Sandler, Adam (April 11, 1994). “D.A. Garcetti denies Jackson probe ended”. Variety.
  • ^ Meyer, Josh (July 04, 1994). “Jackson and Arson Cases in Limbo”. “LA Times.”
  • ^ url=Ryan, Joel (1998-04-10). “Michael Jackson’s Victory”. Archived from the original on February 9, 2005. Retrieved November 18, 2009.
  • ^ Thomson, Charles (June 14, 2010). “One of the Most Shameful Episodes in Journalistic History”. The Huffington Post.
  • ^ Hutchinson, Bill (November 18, 2009). “Evan Chandler, dad of boy who accused Michael Jackson of molestation, commits suicide in New Jersey”. NYDailyNews.com. New York. Retrieved June 25, 2010.
  • ^ Allen, Nick (November 17, 2009). “Michael Jackson: father of Jordan Chandler shoots himself dead”. telegraph.co.uk. London. Archived from the original on November 20, 2009. Retrieved November 17, 2009.
  • ^ Robinson, Eugene (November 15, 1993). “Pepsi Drops Elusive Michael Jackson”. Washington Post.
  • ^ a b Weinraub, Bernard (November 16, 1993). “Jackson Being Treated Abroad For Addiction, Lawyer Says”. New York Times.
  • ^ Campbell, p. 148–149
  • ^ Van Luling, Todd (January 25, 2016). “The Michael Jackson Video Game Conspiracy”. HuffPost. Retrieved June 15, 2017.
  • ^ Lewis, p. 95
  • ^ Lewis p. 125–126
  • ^ a b Erlewine, Stephen. “Michael Jackson HIStory Overview”. Allmusic. Retrieved June 15, 2008.
  • ^ a b Hunter, James (August 10, 1995). “Michael Jackson HIStory”. Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on June 22, 2008. Retrieved June 15, 2008.
  • ^ “Thomas W. (Tom) Sneddon, Jr”. ndaa.org. Archived from the original on January 2, 2008. Retrieved July 12, 2008.
  • ^ “Michael Jackson formally charged in molestation case”. CNN. December 18, 2003. Retrieved May 1, 2011.
  • ^ “Who Is Tom Sneddon?”. CBS. December 17, 2003. Archived from the original on May 20, 2007. Retrieved May 29, 2007.
  • ^ Broder, John M.; LeDuff, Charlie (February 1, 2005). “Jackson Trial Starts, With Fanfare and Jury Selection”. The New York Times. Retrieved May 1, 2011.
  • ^ “Jackson defense loses bid to ban past allegations”. CNN. March 29, 2005. Retrieved May 1, 2011.
  • ^ a b c d e Thomson, Charles (June 13, 2010). “One of the Most Shameful Episodes In Journalistic History”. The Huffington Post. Retrieved January 24, 2011.
  • Works cited[edit]

    • Campbell, Lisa D. (September 1994). Michael Jackson: The King of Pops Darkest Hour. Branden Books. ISBN 978-0-8283-2003-0. Retrieved September 22, 2011.
    • Fischer, Mary A. (October 1994). “Did Michael do it? / Was Michael Jackson Framed? The Untold Story”. GQ. 64 (10): 214, 216–221, 265–269.
    • George, Nelson (2004). Michael Jackson: The Ultimate Collection booklet. Sony BMG.
    • Jones, Aphrodite; Tom Mesereau (June 1, 2007). Michael Jackson Conspiracy. iUniverse. ISBN 978-0-9795498-0-9. Archived from the original on August 11, 2009. Retrieved August 6, 2009.
    • Jel Jones (June 1, 2005). Michael Jackson, the king of pop: the big picture : the music! the man! the legend! the interviews : an anthology. Amber Communications Group, Inc. ISBN 978-0-9749779-0-4. Retrieved September 22, 2011.
    • Mesereau, Thomas A.; Sanger, Robert M.; Oxman, Brian (March 22, 2005). “Mr. Jackson’s Memorandum In Support Of Objection To Subpoena To Larry Feldman For Settlement Documents” (PDF). Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. Retrieved January 24, 2011.
    • J. Randy Taraborrelli (June 4, 2004). Michael Jackson: the magic and the madness. ISBN 978-0-330-42005-1. Retrieved September 22, 2011.
    • Michael Jackson portal
    • 1990s portal


    Matt Gaetz

    American politician

    Matthew Louis Gaetz II[1] (/ɡeɪts/ “gates”; born May 7, 1982) is an American attorney who has served as the U.S. Representative for Florida’s 1st congressional district since 2017, where he is a member of the Budget, Armed Services, and Judiciary Committees. He is a member of the Republican Party. Prior to serving in Congress he was a member of the Florida House of Representatives, representing the 4th District, which includes most of Okaloosa County, from 2010 to 2016. He has also worked as an attorney in Fort Walton Beach, Florida. He is currently under investigation by The Florida Bar for allegedly intimidating a witness.[2][3]

    Contents

    • 1 Early life and education
    • 2 Florida House of Representatives
    • 3 2016 Florida Senate and U.S. House races
    • 4 U.S. House of Representatives
      • 4.1 Committee assignments
    • 5 Political positions
      • 5.1 Gun policy
      • 5.2 Russia investigation
        • 5.2.1 Special Counsel investigation
      • 5.3 Cannabis
      • 5.4 Donald Trump
      • 5.5 Economy
        • 5.5.1 Tax reform
      • 5.6 Environment
      • 5.7 Health care
      • 5.8 Immigration
      • 5.9 Gay Rights
    • 6 Issues and controversies
      • 6.1 Drunk driving arrest and speeding tickets
      • 6.2 Apparent threat directed at Michael Cohen
    • 7 References
    • 8 External links

    Early life and education

    Gaetz was born in Hollywood, Florida, to Victoria “Vicky” (Quertermous) and politician Don Gaetz, and grew up in the Fort Walton Beach area of Florida.[4][5] He graduated from Florida State University in 2003 and from The College of William and Mary in 2007 with a J.D..[6] His father Don represented parts of Northwest Florida as a member of the Florida State Senate from 2006 to 2016 and served as Senate President from 2012 to 2014. Gaetz’s grandfather, Jerry Gaetz, was the mayor of Rugby, North Dakota and a candidate for Lieutenant Governor of North Dakota at the 1964 North Dakota Republican Party state convention, where he died of a heart attack.[7]

    Florida House of Representatives

    Gaetz with Rick Scott in 2010

    In 2010, following the resignation of Republican State Representative Ray Sansom due to corruption charges,[8] Gaetz ran in the special election to succeed Sansom in the 4th District, which included southern Santa Rosa County and Okaloosa County. In a crowded Republican primary that included Craig Barker, Kabe Woods, Jerry G. Melvin, and Bill Garvie, Gaetz won with 43% of the vote. In the special general election, Gaetz defeated Democratic nominee Jan Fernald, winning 66% of the vote. He was unopposed for a full term in 2010. In 2012, following the reconfiguration of Florida House of Representatives districts, Gaetz’s district no longer contained any of Santa Rosa County. He was reelected, unopposed, in 2012 and 2014.

    While serving in the state house, Gaetz joined with State Senator Joe Negron to propose legislation “designed to accelerate the execution of many of the 404 inmates on Florida’s death row” by requiring the Governor to sign a death warrant for those inmates who have exhausted their appeals,[9] noting, “Only God can judge. But we can sure set up the meeting.”[10] He also joined forces with State Senator Greg Evers to propose legislation that eliminated the federal ethanol content mandate that 10% of gasoline sold in Florida contain ethanol;[11][12] the legislation was signed by Governor Rick Scott in May 2013.[13]

    Following the trial of George Zimmerman for the shooting of Trayvon Martin, Will Weatherford, the Speaker of the Florida House of Representatives, announced that he would order hearings on the “stand-your-ground” law that was raised as an issue during the trial.[14] Gaetz, the Chairman of the Criminal Justice Subcommittee, was tasked with reviewing the legislation, and announced before hearings that he would not support changing “one damn comma,” though he indicated that he would listen to both sides’ testimony during the hearings.[15] Following the conclusion of the hearings, he authored legislation that would allow defendants who successfully used a “stand your ground” defense during their trial “to apply for a ‘certificate of eligibility’ to expunge information related to ‘stand your ground’ from their criminal records.”[16]

    When his subcommittee was considering legislation that would “keep mug shots of people who are charged with crimes off the Internet until they are convicted,” Gaetz brought up his 2008 arrest for driving under the influence, arguing that his mistakes made him who he is and that publicly available mug shots “could be a problem for those unaccustomed to publicity.”[17]

    2016 Florida Senate and U.S. House races

    In 2013, Gaetz announced that in 2016 he would run for the 1st District state senate seat then held by his father, State Senator Don Gaetz, who was due to be term-limited out of the Senate in 2016.[18] On March 21, 2016, Gaetz withdrew from the state race, choosing instead to run for the U.S. House seat representing Florida’s 1st congressional district; the incumbent, Jeff Miller, had announced eleven days earlier that he would not seek reelection.[19]

    On August 30, 2016, Gaetz won the Republican primary with 35.7% of the vote – defeating Greg Evers (21.5%), Cris Dosev (20.6%), and five other candidates.[20] This effectively clinched the seat, because the 1st District is the most Republican in Florida, and one of the most Republican in the nation. In the November 8, 2016, general election, Gaetz defeated Democratic candidate Steven Specht with 69 percent of the vote.[21]

    U.S. House of Representatives

    Matt Gaetz speaking at a celebration for the completion of the US 98 interchange

    On September 25, 2016, following the death of Miami Marlins’ pitcher José Fernández, Gaetz criticized the athletes protesting during the national anthem in a tweet: “To all who will kneel during the anthem today – just remember how José Fernández risked his life just for the chance to stand for it”.[22][23]

    Gaetz was listed as a member of the moderate Republican Main Street Partnership from at least January to June 2017.[24][25][26]

    Committee assignments

    • Committee on Armed Services
      • Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations
      • Subcommittee on Tactical Air and Land Forces
    • Committee on the Budget
    • Committee on the Judiciary
      • Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property and the Internet
      • Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform, Commercial and Antitrust Law
    • Republican Study Committee[27]

    Political positions

    Gun policy

    Gaetz has been called “one of the most pro-gun members to have ever served in the Florida Legislature” by former NRA president Marion Hammer.[28] Gaetz is a “Lifetime Member” of the NRA,[28] and has an A+ rating from the NRA—its highest rating.[29]

    When Gaetz served in the Florida House of Representatives, he led an effort to allow Floridians with concealed-weapons permits to carry those weapons openly in public,[30] which was ultimately unsuccessful. In lobbying for the passage of the bill, Gaetz said that the open carry of weapons was a right “granted not by government but by God.”[31][32] Gaetz supports Florida’s stand-your-ground law and supported legislation that strengthened it against legal challenges.[33] Gaetz also supports concealed carry reciprocity.[33]

    Russia investigation

    Special Counsel investigation

    In November 2017 Gaetz introduced a congressional resolution calling for Robert Mueller to recuse himself as Special Counsel because of what were said to be conflicts of interest.[34] In the resolution Gaetz also asked for a Special Counsel investigation into the handling of the Hillary Clinton email controversy by the FBI, undue interference by Attorney General Loretta Lynch in the investigation, and the acquisition of Uranium One by the Russian state corporation Rosatom during Mueller’s time as FBI director.[35][36] Gaetz stated that he did not trust Mueller to lead the investigation because of Mueller’s alleged involvement in approval of the Uranium One deal and Mueller’s close relationship with the dismissed FBI director James Comey, a probable person of interest in a proposed new investigation.[37][38]

    After Ohio Congressman Jim Jordan’s denial that he was aware of the sexual abuse of Ohio State University wrestlers during the period when Jordan was a coach there,[39] Gaetz said that the allegations came from people in the “Deep State” and were intended to reduce the credibility of Jordan’s criticism of Mueller’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections.[40][41]

    Gaetz said of then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions that “… over at the Department of Justice, he’s got Stockholm Syndrome, he’s become sympathetic with his captors over there in the Deep State.”[42]

    Cannabis

    Gaetz supports rescheduling cannabis from a Schedule I drug to a Schedule III drug, enabling further research and expanded use of marijuana for medicinal purposes.[43] In 2015 he sponsored a House bill to expand Florida’s Right to Try Act to include medical marijuana.[44][45] The bill as amended was approved by the governor in March 2016.[46] In September 2017, Gaetz keynoted the American Medical Marijuana Physicians Association’s annual conference.[47]

    Donald Trump

    On February 23, 2017, Gaetz, worried about protesters disrupting his speaking at his town hall in Pace, Florida, prepared what his staffers called “the ‘non-verbal town hall,’ reminiscent of a scene from the movie Love Actually. Gaetz printed out part of his speech onto giant boards that he would hold up if he was unable to get a word in.”[48] One of the signs prepared for Gaetz had the words “Professional Liberal Protestors”.[48] Gaetz arrived 30 minutes late to the town hall meeting, where he faced at least 500 constituents crowded into the Oops Bowling Alley. At the meeting he was grilled about his relationship with Trump, his stance on repealing the Affordable Care Act, and his proposal to abolish the EPA. He surprised the audience and got a round of applause when he said, “Absolutely, Donald Trump should release his tax returns.” But he stopped short of saying Congress should subpoena those returns. Gaetz closed his town hall by shouting “Make America Great Again” over roaring opposition from the crowd.[49][50][51]

    In April 2018, Politico described Gaetz as “one of the most enthusiastic defenders of President Trump on cable news” and a “proud Trump protege”.[52] Aaron Blake of The Washington Post referred to him as one of Congress’s “most controversial members,” and one who has “unabashedly aligned himself with Trump on basically all things.”[53]

    Economy

    Tax reform

    Gaetz voted in support of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[54] He acknowledged that the bill’s pass-through tax deduction would benefit President Trump, and added, “but so many Americans benefit when commercial real estate becomes easier and more accessible.”[55]

    Environment

    In 2016, Gaetz acknowledged global warming but said he disagrees with the scientific consensus on climate change that human activity is the primary cause. Gaetz said “In our fervor to protect the environment, we lose sight of economic and scientific reality.”[56] In April 2017, the Center for American Progress and Vice Media said Gaetz was a climate change denier, citing his 2016 statements.[57][58] In November 2017 Gaetz joined the bipartisan Climate Solutions Caucus.[59][60] He said, “I don’t think there’s a scientific debate left to be had on if it is happening. I also think history is going to judge very harshly climate change deniers, and I don’t want to be one of them.” He said that he advocates technological innovation and economic incentives that address climate change, and increased federal funds for global warming research by NASA, NOAA and universities, but that he remains opposed to increased environmental regulation.[61]

    In 2017, Gaetz proposed legislation to “completely abolish” the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). He said, “our small businesses cannot afford to cover the costs associated with compliance, too often leading to closed doors and unemployed Americans. It is time to take back our legislative power from the EPA and abolish it permanently.”[12][62]

    Health care

    In October 2017, Gaetz said that the Medicaid expansion fueled the opioid crisis.[63] PolitiFact rated the claim as “mostly false”, noting that “experts were universal in saying that the evidence that Medicaid expansion is somehow fueling the opioid crisis doesn’t exist.”[63]

    Immigration

    Gaetz opposes sanctuary cities, which opt not to dedicate local law enforcement resources to prosecuting people solely for being undocumented.[64] Upon announcing his run for Congress in 2016, Gaetz declared that illegal immigrants are “sucking us dry.”[65] In January 2018 Gaetz defended an alleged controversial comment on Haiti by Trump, saying that Haiti was in a “disgusting” condition.[66]

    In October 2018, Gaetz falsely claimed that George Soros paid for a caravan of migrants from Central America to the United States.[67]

    Gay Rights

    As a Florida State Representative in 2015 Gaetz co-authored an amendment with Democratic Rep. David Richardson to repeal the state’s 38-year old ban on gay adoption.[68] The amendment was adopted and the larger adoption incentive bill (HB7013) passed the Florida House of Representatives on a 68-50 vote.[69] The bill then went to the Florida State Senate, where there was pressure by some conservative lawmakers who wanted the amendment taken out. There, his father State Senator Don Gaetz led the bill to passage. The elder Gaetz later revealed that it was Matt who “sat him down” and gave him perspective on the bill as a younger person, urging that Republicans shouldn’t block it.[70] The bill was signed by Governor Rick Scott later that year.[71][72]

    Issues and controversies

    In its July–August 2017 issue, Foreign Policy reported that Devin Murphy, a Gaetz legislative aide, had written a resolution that Gaetz brought to the House Judiciary Committee using primarily content from /r/The Donald, “a pro-Trump subreddit notorious for both its embrace of conspiracy theories and its gleeful offensiveness.” One of the allegations was that James Comey had leaked investigative matters to New York Times reporter Michael S. Schmidt, beginning when Schmidt would have been around 10 years old.[73] In an email to Wired magazine, Gaetz said, “It is the responsibility of our staff to gather as much information as possible when researching a subject and provide that information for consideration. We pride ourselves on seeking as much citizen input as possible.”[74] The /r/The_Donald posters’ suggestions are represented in “roughly two-thirds of the total finished amendment.”[74]

    In January 2018, Gaetz invited alt-right Holocaust denier[75] Charles C. “Chuck” Johnson to attend President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address. Gaetz said that he had no “pre-existing” relationship with Johnson and only invited him to attend when Johnson showed up at his office, providing him the ticket which Gaetz’s father could not use due to his bronchitis. According to Johnson, he was invited by several members of Congress but “took Gaetz’s invitation” because “he’s into stuff on the issues that I care about.”[76] Johnson had previously raised money for the neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer.[77] Gaetz said in an interview that Johnson was “not a Holocaust denier, he’s not a white supremacist”.[75]

    Drunk driving arrest and speeding tickets

    In 2008, Gaetz was arrested for a DUI as he was driving back from the Swamp, a nightclub on Okaloosa Island, Florida. Although during the arrest he refused to take a breathalyzer test, the Tampa Bay Times reported “he didn’t have his license suspended for a year when he refused the breath test — as Florida law dictates. And he didn’t have that refusal used against him in a criminal proceeding.” Charges against him were dismissed, despite the fact that the police reported “Gaetz fumbled for his license and registration, his eyes were watery and bloodshot, and he swayed and staggered when he got out of the car.” Gaetz cited the dropped charges as proof that he was innocent.[78]

    Between 1999 and 2014, Gaetz received 16 speeding tickets in Florida.[79]

    Apparent threat directed at Michael Cohen

    On February 26, 2019 – the night before the scheduled public hearing of Michael Cohen, Donald Trump’s former personal attorney, before the House Oversight Committee[80][81] – Gaetz directed a tweet toward Cohen[82] that implied without evidence that Cohen had had multiple extra-marital affairs and also suggested his wife might be unfaithful while he was imprisoned due to new information disclosed to her.[53] The tweet was seen by other members of Congress as an attempt to intimidate a witness.[53][83][2][84] After their sharp criticism – and an “implicit rebuke”[85] by House Speaker Pelosi[85][86] – Gaetz deleted the tweet and posted a tweet in which he apologized.[84][87][88] During the hearing, Oversight Committee member Stacey Plaskett, a Democrat, emphasized her background as a prosecutor and counsel on House ethics and recommended that Gaetz be referred to both the House Ethics Committee and criminal prosecutors over witness intimidation and tampering.[89][90][91][92] Following the tweet, The Florida Bar opened an investigation into Gaetz.[2][3][93]

    References

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  • ^ Sarlin, Benjy (19 December 2017). “Republican-led Congress passes sweeping tax bill”. WAVY-TV. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  • ^ Breaux, Collin (April 16, 2016). “Local political figures cautious about sea level rise”. The News Herald. Panama City, Florida. Retrieved November 3, 2017.
  • ^ Moser, Claire; Koronowski, Ryan (April 28, 2017). “The Climate Denier Caucus in Trump’s Washington”. ThinkProgress. Center for American Progress. Retrieved November 3, 2017.
  • ^ “Florida’s Climate Change Deniers”. Vice Media. April 25, 2017. Motherboard. Retrieved November 3, 2017.
  • ^ “90 Current Climate Solutions Caucus Members”. Citizen´s Climate Lobby. Retrieved 20 October 2018.
  • ^ Valk, Steve (December 5, 2017). “Matt Gaetz, the Climate Solutions Caucus and the bumpy road to bipartisan consensus”. Citizens’ Climate Lobby. Retrieved April 26, 2018.
  • ^ Baucum, Joseph (November 25, 2017). “After pushing bill to abolish EPA, Rep. Matt Gaetz joins Climate Solutions Caucus”. Pensacola News Journal. Retrieved December 14, 2017.
  • ^ “H.R.861 – To terminate the Environmental Protection Agency”. February 3, 2017. Retrieved February 23, 2017.
  • ^ a b “No evidence to prove Medicaid expansion fueled opioid crisis”. @politifact. Retrieved 2017-11-04.
  • ^ “No comprehensive data available to back Gaetz’s claim”. @politifact. Retrieved 2017-11-04.
  • ^ Kam, Dara. “Matt Gaetz runs for U.S. Congress, blasts ‘illegal immigrants’ and ‘Muslim terrorists'”. Orlando Weekly. Retrieved 22 December 2017.
  • ^ Mazza, Ed (16 January 2018). “GOP Lawmaker Matt Gaetz Slams Haiti: ‘Sheet Metal And Garbage’ Everywhere You Look”. HuffPost. Retrieved 17 January 2018.
  • ^ Qiu, Linda (October 20, 2018). “Did Democrats, or George Soros, Fund Migrant Caravan? Despite Republican Claims, No”. The New York Times. Retrieved October 21, 2018.
  • ^ “Amendment 936767”. MyFloridahouse.gov. Fl House.
  • ^ “House vote” (PDF). Fl Senate.
  • ^ Menzel, Margie. “Gaetz Speech”. SayFieReview. The News Service Of Florida. Retrieved 5 August 2015.
  • ^ Perry, Mitch. “Rick Scott signs bill that repeals gay-adoption ban in Florida”. Florida Politics. Retrieved 11 June 2015.
  • ^ “Florida Poised To Repeal 38-Year-Old Ban On Gay Adoption”. CBSMiami. Retrieved 8 April 2015.
  • ^ Jurecic, Quinta (August 1, 2017). “The House Judiciary Committee Is Hard at Work Investigating Reddit Conspiracies”. Foreign Policy. Retrieved August 2, 2017.
  • ^ a b Feinberg, Ashley (July 18, 2017). “A GOP Staffer Crowdsourced an Anti-Clinton Resolution from Reddit”. Wired. Retrieved August 2, 2017.
  • ^ a b “GOP lawmaker condemned for inviting Holocaust denier to State of the Union”. The Guardian. February 1, 2018.
  • ^ Markay, Lachlan (January 31, 2018). “Florida (Congress)Man Invited Infamous Troll Chuck Johnson to Trump’s State of The Union”. The Daily Beast. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  • ^ Delk, Josh (January 31, 2018). “GOP rep invited alt-right activist to the State of the Union”. The Hill. Retrieved January 31, 2018.
  • ^ “Lawmaker’s talk of mug shot raises questions about DUI arrest”. Michael Van Sickler, Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved September 27, 2016.
  • ^ Krauth, Dan; Heimeriks, Niels (July 25, 2014). “Some legislators rack up multiple speeding tickets, Scripps investigation finds”. TC Palm. Retrieved December 16, 2017.
  • ^ “Schedule – Week of February 25–March 1, 2019”. House Oversight Committee. February 22, 2019. Archived from the original on February 27, 2019.
  • ^ Gerstein, Josh (February 20, 2019). “Michael Cohen to testify Feb. 27 before House Oversight Committee”. Politico. Archived from the original on February 22, 2019. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  • ^ Gaetz, Matt (February 26, 2019). “Gaetz’s Tweet to Cohen”. Archived from the original on February 26, 2019. Retrieved February 26, 2019 – via Twitter.
  • ^ Bade, Rachael (February 26, 2019). “Trump ally threatens Cohen with unsubstantiated allegation of womanizing”. The Washington Post. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  • ^ a b Cillizza, Chris (February 26, 2019). “A high-profile Trump ally in Congress just straight-up threatened Michael Cohen”. CNN. Archived from the original on February 27, 2019. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  • ^ a b Restuccia, Andrew; Samuelsohn, Darren (February 27, 2019). “Trump ally Gaetz apologizes for threatening Michael Cohen ahead of hearing”. Politico. Retrieved February 28, 2019.
  • ^ Pascus, Brian (February 27, 2019). “Rep. Matt Gaetz facing investigation over tweet about Michael Cohen”. CBS News. Retrieved February 28, 2019.
  • ^ Clark, Dartunorro; Reiss, Adam; Koenig, Kailani (February 26, 2019). “GOP Rep. Matt Gaetz apologizes for tweet targeting Michael Cohen”. NBC News. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  • ^ “Rep. Matt Gaetz tweets cryptic warning to Michael Cohen ahead of hearing”. CBS News. February 26, 2019. Archived from the original on February 27, 2019. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  • ^ “Dem lawmaker at Cohen hearing calls on Matt Gaetz to be ‘referred for criminal prosecution’ for witness tampering”. Raw Story. 27 February 2019.
  • ^ “Dem Congresswoman Suggests ‘Criminal Prosecution’ For Matt Gaetz at Cohen Hearing”.
  • ^ “Rep. Matt Gaetz facing investigation over tweet about Michael Cohen”. www.cbsnews.com.
  • ^ “Michael Cohen testifies before Congress: Live updates”. www.cnn.com. 27 February 2019.
  • ^ Contorno, Steve (February 27, 2019). “Matt Gaetz under investigation by the Florida Bar for Tweet at Michael Cohen”. Tampa Bay Timest. Retrieved February 28, 2019.
  • External links

    • Congressman Matt Gaetz official U.S. House site
    • Campaign website
    • Matt Gaetz at Curlie
    • Biography at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
    • Profile at Vote Smart
    • Financial information (federal office) at the Federal Election Commission
    • Legislation sponsored at the Library of Congress
    • Appearances on C-SPAN

    Minority party

    • 116th United States Congress
    • List of acts of the 116th United States Congress


    Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators

    Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators is a comedy-drama mystery television series set in Stratford-upon-Avon. It is produced by the BBC for afternoon broadcast in the UK by the same production team as Doctors, Land Girls, Father Brown, The Coroner and WPC 56.

    Contents

    • 1 Plot
    • 2 Cast and characters
    • 3 Episodes
      • 3.1 Series 1 (2018)
      • 3.2 Series 2 (2019)
    • 4 Airing on PBS in the US
    • 5 DVD releases
    • 6 References
    • 7 External links

    Plot[edit]

    Ex-Detective Inspector Frank Hathaway, now a debt-laden private investigator, meets Luella Shakespeare when she employs him to investigate the fiancé she met online. Hathaway and his assistant Sebastian Brudenell discover that the fiancé is a con man. They report back to Luella, but she is reassured by her fiancé, and the wedding occurs.

    When her new husband is killed at the reception, Luella is suspected of murder by local Detective Inspector Christina Marlowe, who had been Frank’s junior. Luella is thrown together with Frank and Sebastian to crack the mystery of what has happened, and after her name is cleared, she uses her recovered savings to buy into Frank’s business. Frank’s only employee is Sebastian Brudenell, a young aspiring RADA-trained actor who uses his skills when undercover investigations are required. He lives above a theatre costumier run by Gloria Fonteyn.

    Cast and characters[edit]

    • Jo Joyner as Luella Shakespeare
    • Mark Benton as Frank Hathaway
    • Patrick Walshe McBride as Sebastian Brudenell
    • Amber Aga as Detective Inspector Christina Marlowe
    • Tomos Eames as Detective Sergeant Keeler
    • Roberta Taylor as Gloria Fonteyn

    Episodes[edit]

    Series 1 (2018)[edit]

    Series 2 (2019)[edit]

    Airing on PBS in the US[edit]

    The first series began airing on PBS in the US on the weekend of January 12-13, 2019.[1]

    DVD releases[edit]

    A Region B-locked Blu-ray of Series 1 is scheduled for release on 4 March 2019. Series 2 is scheduled for simultaneous DVD/Blu-ray release in the UK on 22 April 2019.[2]

    References[edit]

  • ^ Young, Bill (24 October 2018). “‘Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators’ heads to public television in 2019″. KERA Tellyspotting. Retrieved 12 January 2019..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  • ^ https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shakespeare-Hathaway-Private-Investigators-BBC/dp/B07GGBPVVH/ref=sr_1_3?crid=35DE5IEHGJ7MC&keywords=shakespeare+and+hathaway&qid=1551191646&s=gateway&sprefix=Shakespeare%2Caps%2C218&sr=8-3
  • External links[edit]

    • Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators on IMDb
    • Shakespeare & Hathaway: Private Investigators at BBC Programmes


    Jim Jordan (American political leader).

    For other people named “Jim Jordan” or “James Jordan”, see James Jordan (disambiguation).

    James Daniel Jordan (born February 17, 1964) is the U.S. Representative for Ohio’s 4th congressional district, serving since 2007, as well as the current Ranking Member of the House Oversight Committee. He is a member of the Republican Party, and a founding member of the Freedom Caucus. The district is located in the north-central and western portions of the state and includes Lima, Tiffin, and Elyria.

    In 2018, he announced that he would run for the House Speaker position that will be vacant upon Paul Ryan’s retirement in January 2019,[1] but the Democratic party took the majority in the U.S. House of Representatives that year, barring Jordan from becoming speaker. After the election, Jordan lost his bid for House Minority Leader to California Republican Kevin McCarthy in a 159-43 vote.[2]

    Contents

    • 1 Early life, education and early career
    • 2 Political career
      • 2.1 Ohio General Assembly
      • 2.2 U.S. House of Representatives
        • 2.2.1 Committee assignments
        • 2.2.2 Caucus memberships
        • 2.2.3 Legislation
      • 2.3 Political positions
        • 2.3.1 Taxes
        • 2.3.2 Environment
        • 2.3.3 Planned Parenthood
        • 2.3.4 Trump administration, Special Counsel and FBI
      • 2.4 2013 U.S. government shutdown
    • 3 Political campaigns
    • 4 Ohio State University abuse scandal
    • 5 Personal life
    • 6 Electoral history
    • 7 References
    • 8 External links

    Early life, education and early career[edit]

    Jordan was born and raised in Champaign County, Ohio, and attended Graham High School, graduating in 1982. While at Graham, he was a four-time state wrestling champion with a career record of 150–1. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1986, obtaining his bachelor’s degree in economics.

    Jordan was a two-time NCAA Division I wrestling champion. In the 1985 NCAA championship match, Jordan defeated future two-time Olympic gold medalist and four-time world champion John Smith.[3]

    He later earned a master’s degree in education from the Ohio State University in Columbus, and in 2001 obtained his J.D. degree from Capital University Law School, also in Columbus.

    Political career[edit]

    Ohio General Assembly[edit]

    Jordan was first elected to the Ohio General Assembly in November 1994 and went on to serve three terms as State Representative of the 85th Ohio House District. In 1996, he offered an amendment to the Welfare Reform Bill that limited the amount of time that an able-bodied individual could remain on welfare. He also created the Income Tax Reduction Fund, which required that any state revenue surpluses be used to lower the income tax burden on Ohioans rather than be used for further government spending.[citation needed]

    In 2000, he won a seat in the Ohio Senate by defeating independent candidate Jack Kaffenberger by a margin of 88 percent to 12 percent. In 2004, Jordan defeated Kaffenberger again, this time by a smaller margin of 79 percent to 21 percent. In May 2006, Jordan won the Republican primary race for the 4th Congressional district of Ohio. He also won a 100% lifetime rating from the Ohio Taxpayers Association, which endorsed Jordan in his bid for Congress.[4]

    Jordan was named Watchdog of the Treasury (1996, 2000, 2004), Outstanding Legislator (2004), Outstanding Freshman Legislator (1996), Friend of the Taxpayer (1997), and Pro-Life Legislator of the Year (1998) by the United Conservatives of Ohio, the Defender of Life award from the Ohio Right to Life Society, and the 2001 Leadership in Government Award from the Ohio Roundtable and Freedom Forum.[citation needed] Additionally, Senate President Bill Harris appointed Jordan to be the chairman of the Senate Judiciary on Criminal Justice Committee.

    U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

    Jordan won the Republican primary for the 4th District in 2006 after 26-year incumbent Mike Oxley announced his retirement. Despite the strong anti-Republican mood in Ohio that year, Jordan won the general election, defeating Democrat Rick Siferd, 60% to 40%. The 4th has long been considered one of the most (if not the most) Republican districts in Ohio and the nation; the district and its predecessors have been in Republican hands for all but 16 years since the Civil War.

    He was reelected in 2008, defeating Democrat Mike Carroll 65% to 35%.[5]

    Jordan chaired the Republican Study Committee[6] during the 112th Congress. He was elected over Representative Louie Gohmert.[7] Jordan reportedly turned down a position on the Appropriations Committee.[8] Princeton University historian Julian Zelizer wrote that during Obama’s presidency “Jordan proved to be a master of the technical side of public policy and understood how to play the legislative game. He believed firmly in using obstructionist techniques to advance his cause. Although there was no filibuster in the House, he learned that there were several procedural tools available to House members, particularly in the majority, to block a president.”[9]

    During the 114th Congress, Jordan helped found the House Freedom Caucus, a group of conservatives working to “support open, accountable and limited government, the Constitution and the rule of law, and policies that promote the liberty, safety and prosperity of all Americans.”[10] He served as the group’s first chairman.[11]

    Jordan received a vote for Speaker on January 3, 2013, the first day of the 113th Congress from fellow conservative, Tea Party Caucus chairman Tim Huelskamp, of Kansas. Jordan received two votes for Speaker during the 114th Congress.[12]

    On July 26, 2018, Jordan announced his new campaign to take the House speakership that will be vacated by the departure of Paul Ryan.[1] On November 14, he lost his bid to be House Minority Leader to Kevin McCarthy. [13]

    Jordan showed his true self as an anti-Semite on March 4 on Twitter.

    Committee assignments[edit]

    • Committee on the Judiciary
      • Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet
      • Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice
    • Committee on Oversight and Government Reform (ranking member)
      • Subcommittee on Health Care, Benefits, and Administrative Rules
      • Subcommittee on Government Operations
    • House Select Committee on the Events Surrounding the 2012 Terrorist Attack in Benghazi

    Caucus memberships[edit]

    • Freedom Caucus [14]
    • Congressional Constitution Caucus[15]
    • Congressional Western Caucus[16]
    • U.S.-Japan Caucus[17]

    Legislation[edit]

    On May 2, 2014, Jordan introduced the simple resolution Calling on Attorney General Eric H. Holder, Jr., to appoint a special counsel to investigate the targeting of conservative nonprofit groups by the Internal Revenue Service (H.Res. 565; 113th Congress) into the House, where it passed on May 7, 2014.[18] The resolution asks Holder to appoint a special counsel to investigate the 2013 IRS scandal. Jordan said that “we need this special counsel to help us get to the truth because the so-called investigation by the Justice Department has been a joke. The current investigation has no credibility because it is being headed by a maxed-out donor who is financially invested in the president’s success.”[19]

    In March 2017, Jordan criticized the newly-introduced American Health Care Act, the Republican replacement bill for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as an unacceptable form of “Obamacare Lite.”[20] He later revised his position, voting on May 4, 2017, to pass a revised version of the American Health Care Act.[21][22]

    In a Vanity Fair article published October 30, 2017, John Boehner, former Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, said of Jim Jordan’s legislative background: “Jordan was a terrorist as a legislator going back to his days in the Ohio House and Senate … A terrorist. A legislative terrorist.”[23]

    Political positions[edit]

    According to The Dayton Daily News, Jordan “is known for being one of Congress’ most conservative members.”[24]

    In Congress, Jordan is among the most conservative Republicans, earning a perfect score from the American Conservative Union.[25] He has voted consistently for anti-abortion legislation and was endorsed by Ohio Right to Life in 2012.[26] During the 112th Congress, he was one of 40 “staunch” members of the Republican Study Committee who frequently voted against Republican party leadership and vocally expressed displeasure with House bills.[27]

    Jordan has been a leading critic of President Barack Obama’s Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP) program, advocating for its shutdown.[28]

    Jordan has supported the continued production and upgrades of M1 Abrams tanks in his district. The Pentagon opposed the bipartisan action to maintain funding.[29] The Pentagon wants to put a hold on tank upgrades at a Lima plant until a new version is ready, possibly in 2017, in order to save $3 billion. The plant supports approximately 800 jobs in the district.[30][31]

    Asked by Anderson Cooper in April 2018 whether he had heard President Trump tell a lie, Jordan said “I have not” and “nothing comes to mind.”[32] He also said, “I don’t know that [Mr. Trump has ever] said something wrong that he needs to apologize for.”[33]

    Taxes[edit]

    While serving in the Ohio Senate, he supported the Tax and Expenditure Limitation Amendment, a state constitutional amendment that would require a vote of the people in order to raise taxes or increase spending over certain limits.[34]

    Environment[edit]

    In July 2008, Jordan was the first member of Congress to sign the “No Climate Tax” pledge, drafted by the conservative political advocacy group, Americans for Prosperity, founded and funded by the Koch brothers, which read “I will oppose any legislation relating to climate change that includes a net increase in government revenue.”[35] He followed this with votes to open Outer Continental Shelf to oil drilling, prevent the EPA from regulating greenhouse gases, and bar greenhouse gases from Clean Air Act rules. He voted against enforcing limits on carbon dioxide (CO2) global warming pollution, tax credits for renewable electricity, tax incentives for renewable energy and energy conservation and on curtailing subsidies for oil & gas company exploration,[36] earning him a 4% lifetime score on the National Environmental Scorecard from the League of Conservation Voters.[37]

    Planned Parenthood[edit]

    On September 29, 2015, Jordan questioned Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards.[38] In the fiercest confrontation of the hearing, Jordan sparred with Richards over her apology over a “staff member’s tone and statements” on a video recording when discussing fetal tissue donation she issued after the first video was made public.[39] Jordan is against Planned Parenthood and actively supports ending Medicaid reimbursements to the organization.[40]

    Trump administration, Special Counsel and FBI[edit]

    Jordan has been a notable supporter of Donald Trump as a presidential candidate and as President. In December 2017, Jordan sought to discredit the FBI and Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.[41] Jordan questioned the impartiality of Mueller, and called on Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein to use his authority to disband the Mueller investigation or create a second special counsel to simultaneously investigate Mueller himself.[41] Rosenstein rejected the request, saying that he could not appoint another special counsel as there was not any credible allegation of any potential crime.[41] The New York Times noted that Republicans increasingly criticised Mueller’s investigation after it “delivered a series of indictments to high-profile associates of the president and evidence that at least two of them are cooperating with the inquiry”.[41] In July 2018, Jordan led efforts to impeach Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein as a way to shut down the Special Counsel’s investigation.[42] During a hearing on July 12, 2018, Jordan repeatedly interrupted FBI agent Peter Strzok while Strzok tried to explain that he couldn’t answer specific questions in order to preserve the confidentiality of an ongoing investigation. Jordan’s behavior caused committee Democrats to protest his dilatory tactics and to allow Strzok to respond. They also objected to Jordan’s exceeding his allowed time for questioning. House Judiciary Committee Chairman, Republican Bob Goodlatte, admonished Jordan for his repeated interruptions of the witness.[43]

    In July 2018, Jordan, along with Mark Meadows called on the Department of Justice to “review allegations that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein threatened to subpoena phone records and documents from a House Intelligence Committee staffer”. In their written request, the two wrote that in his use of investigative powers, Rosenstein had retaliated “against rank-and-file (congressional) staff members”, therefore abusing his authority.[44] Talking to John Catsimatidis on WNYM, Jordan said he would force a vote on the impeachment of Rosenstein if the DOJ does not deliver documents Congress requested.[45]

    In March 2019, Jordan came under criticism from House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler on the grounds of anti-Semitic messagery on Twitter while urging Nadler to resist calls for presidential impeachment.[46][47]

    2013 U.S. government shutdown[edit]

    Jordan criticized Speaker John Boehner’s plan to raise the debt ceiling. In 2010, Jordan was chair of the Republican Study Committee, and during the U.S. government shutdown of 2013, he was still considered its most powerful member.[48] That group was the primary proponent and executor of the Republican Congressional strategy to force a government shutdown, in order to force changes in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.[48]

    Political campaigns[edit]

    2008

    See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio, 2008 § District 4

    Jordan defeated Democratic nominee Mike Carroll.

    2010

    See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio, 2010 § District 4

    Jordan defeated Democrat Doug Litt and Libertarian Donald Kissick in the general election.

    2012

    See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio, 2012 § District 4

    Jordan defeated Democrat Jim Slone and Libertarian Chris Kalla in the general election.

    2014

    See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio, 2014 § District 4

    Jordan defeated Democrat Janet Garrett in the general election.

    2016

    See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio, 2016 § District_4

    Jordan defeated Democrat Janet Garrett in the general election.

    2018

    See also: United States House of Representatives elections in Ohio, 2018 § District_4

    Garrett once more secured the nomination to challenge Jordan. She has avoided the controversy over Jordan’s alleged role in the Ohio State University sexual harassment scandal, focusing her campaign instead on health care and job development.[49] Jordan defeated Garret in the general election.

    Ohio State University abuse scandal[edit]

    Jordan was an assistant wrestling coach with Ohio State University’s wrestling program from 1987 to 1995.[50] OSU opened an investigation in April 2018 that looked into allegations of sexual misconduct by the former wrestling team’s physician, Richard Strauss — who was the physician during Jordan’s tenure as an assistant coach.[51][52] Dr. Strauss committed suicide in 2005.[53] In early July 2018, at least eight former wrestlers said that Jordan had been aware of, but did not respond to, allegations of sexual misconduct by Strauss.[54][55][52][56] If he had seen abuse at the time, Jordan replied, “I would have done something about it.” Former UFC world champion Mark Coleman said, “He knew as far as I’m concerned.”[52] Former 1980s Ohio State wrestler David Range said teammates spoke of Strauss’ behavior often in the locker room while Jordan was present. A nurse who worked with the team was interviewed on video by Politico and confirmed observing Strauss fondling a team member until the athlete ejaculated. Another Ohio wrestler, Dunyasha Yetts, told Politico he had asked both Jordan and Hellickson to be present for an examination with Strauss, to avoid inappropriate touching by Strauss. That allegation was denied by Jordan’s office. One former wrestler said that he saw Jordan kick a male voyeur out of the wrestlers’ sauna, though that would suggest that Jordan was aware that there was a problem — something he has to date denied.[57] None of the wrestlers accused Jordan of personal sexual misconduct.[57]

    Jordan said that the timing of the allegations were “suspect” and said that one of the many former wrestlers who have gone public had a “vendetta” against Ohio State and Jordan’s family.[58] Jordan’s congressional office released a statement by the wrestling team’s former head coach Russ Hellickson in which both he and Jordan denied knowing about the abuse.[59] However, after Jordan’s denial, a June 2018 video emerged showing Hellickson saying that he had confronted Strauss during the doctor’s tenure, for being too “hands on” with the wrestlers and about Strauss showering with them “for an hour”.[60]

    After news of the scandal broke, Jordan criticized CNN for “asking for dirt” from his former staffers and interns.[61] Florida Congressman Matt Gaetz suggested the allegations were intended to damage Jordan’s criticism of Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections.[62] Speaker Ryan defended Jordan, saying he was “a man of honesty and a man of integrity.”[63]

    On August 9, 2018, former UFC world champion Mark Coleman, who had previously said that Jordan knew of the abuse, clarified: “At no time did I ever say or have any direct knowledge that Jim Jordan knew of Dr. Richard Strauss’s inappropriate behavior. I have nothing but respect for Jim Jordan as I have known him for more than 30 years and know him to be of impeccable character.” Coleman stated he was one of the wrestlers abused by the team physician.[64][65][66]

    Personal life[edit]

    Jordan and his wife Polly live near Urbana in central Champaign County. They have four children.[67]

    Electoral history[edit]

    References[edit]

  • ^ a b Conservative Ohio Rep. Jim Jordan to run for House speaker, CNN, Sunlen Serfaty and Lauren Fox, July 26, 2018. Retrieved July 27, 2018.
  • ^ Snell, Kelsey (November 14, 2018). “After Midterm Losses, House Republicans Elect McCarthy As Top Leader”. NPR. Retrieved 28 February 2019..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  • ^ “55th NCAA Wrestling Tournament: 1985” (PDF). Wrestlingstats.com. Retrieved November 9, 2012.
  • ^ “ohiotaxpayers.com”. ohiotaxpayers.com. Archived from the original on October 20, 2006. Retrieved August 23, 2010.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  • ^ “U.S. Congress: November 4, 2008”. Sos.state.oh.us. November 4, 2008. Archived from the original on August 11, 2010. Retrieved August 23, 2010.
  • ^ “Member List”. Republican Study Committee. Retrieved December 21, 2017.
  • ^ Sabrina Eaton/The Plain Dealer (December 8, 2010). “Rep. Jim Jordan selected to chair Republican Study Committee”. cleveland.com. Retrieved July 17, 2011.
  • ^ “Appropriations panel loses its luster – Simmi Aujla and Richard E. Cohen”. Politico.Com. Retrieved July 17, 2011.
  • ^ Zelizer, Julian. “The Presidency of Barack Obama”. Princeton University Press. p. 18. Retrieved 2019-01-05.
  • ^ Eaton, Sabrina (January 26, 2015). “Rep. Jim Jordan to co-found new GOP “House Freedom Caucus””. Cleveland Plain Dealer.
  • ^ Eaton, Sabrina (February 11, 2015). “It’s official: Rep. Jim Jordan now chairs the House Freedom Caucus”. Cleveland Plain Dealer.
  • ^ Davis, Susan (January 6, 2015). “Boehner re-elected as speaker despite GOP dissenters”. USA Today.
  • ^ https://www.vox.com/2018/11/14/18091966/kevin-mccarthy-minority-leader-house-jim-jordan
  • ^ French, Lauren (January 26, 2015). “9 Republicans launch House Freedom Caucus”. Politico. Retrieved December 26, 2016.
  • ^ “Members”. Congressional Constitution Caucus. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  • ^ “Members”. Congressional Western Caucus. Retrieved June 27, 2018.
  • ^ “Members”. U.S. – Japan Caucus. Retrieved 11 December 2018.
  • ^ “H.Res. 565 – All Actions”. United States Congress. Retrieved May 6, 2014.
  • ^ Bedard, Paul (May 2, 2014). “Next: Demand for special counsel to probe IRS scandal, Lois Lerner”. The Washington Examiner. Retrieved May 12, 2014.
  • ^ Yen, Hope (March 13, 2017). “Republicans brace for downbeat CBO analysis of health bill”. CNBC. Retrieved March 13, 2017.
  • ^ “How the House voted to pass the GOP health-care bill”. Washington Post. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  • ^ “Health care vote puts pressure on dozens of vulnerable GOP reps”. USA Today. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  • ^ Nguyen, Tina (October 30, 2017). “”Idiots,” “Anarchists,” and “Assholes”: Boehner Unloads on Republicans”. The Hive. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  • ^ “Who is Rep. Jim Jordan’s favorite liberal? The answer might surprise you”. daytondailynews. Retrieved 2018-07-26.
  • ^ “2008 Votes By State Delegation”. archive.org. Archived from the original on March 24, 2009. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  • ^ “Ohio Right to Life”. Ohiovotesforlife.org. Retrieved November 9, 2012.
  • ^ Steinhauer, Jennifer (March 16, 2012). “G.O.P. Freshmen Not as Defiant as Reputation Suggests”. New York Times.
  • ^ “Cleaning Up the Mortgage Mess”. The Wall Street Journal. August 10, 2010. Retrieved November 3, 2010.
  • ^ Lardner, Richard (April 28, 2013). “Army says no to more tanks, but Congress insists”. Yahoo! News. Associated Press. Retrieved July 13, 2014.
  • ^ Sweigart, Josh (August 18, 2012). “Congress pushes for weapons Pentagon didn’t want”. Dayton Daily News. Retrieved September 30, 2012.
  • ^ “Downsizing the military”. The Week. September 30, 2012. Retrieved September 30, 2012.
  • ^ Savransky, Rebecca (April 17, 2018). “Anderson Cooper confronts GOP lawmaker: You haven’t heard the president lie?”. TheHill. Retrieved April 17, 2018.
  • ^ Cooper, Anderson. “Cooper to lawmaker: Does President Trump lie?” CNN. Video.
  • ^ Drewblade, James. “The Blade ~ Toledo Ohio”. toledoblade.com. Retrieved August 23, 2010.
  • ^ Davenport, Coral and Lipton, Eric “How G.O.P. Leaders Came to View Climate Change as Fake Science”, New York Times, June 3, 2017, Retrieved June 3, 2017.
  • ^ On the Issues: Jim Jordan on Energy and Oil Retrieved June 3, 2017.
  • ^ “National Environmental Scorecard: Jim Jordan”, Retrieved June 3, 2017.
  • ^ “Planned Parenthood defunding”. c-span.org.
  • ^ Ferris, Sarah (September 29, 2015). “Republican gets into shouting match with Planned Parenthood executive”. TheHill. Retrieved July 25, 2017.
  • ^ “A Quick and Easy Guide to the Planned Parenthood Videos”. The Federalist. September 29, 2015. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  • ^ a b c d Fandos, Nicholas; Savage, Charlie (December 13, 2017). “Justice Dept. Official Defends Mueller as Republicans Try to Discredit Him”. The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 14, 2017.
  • ^ Thomsen, Jacqueline (2018-07-13). “Conservatives moving to impeach Rosenstein soon: report”. TheHill. Retrieved 2018-07-15.
  • ^ Committee Erupts In Shouting As Jordan Trucks Over FBI Agent’s Answer To His Question, The Hill, Tierney Sneed, July 12, 2018. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  • ^ Brufke, Julie Grace. “Freedom Caucus lawmakers call on DOJ to probe Rosenstein allegations”. The Hill. Retrieved 17 July 2018.
  • ^ Thomsen, Jacqueline. “Jordan: If Rosenstein doesn’t deliver, Meadows and I will force impeachment vote”. The Hill. Retrieved 30 July 2018.
  • ^ Lafond, Nicole. “Nadler Accuses Jim Jordan Of Anti-Semitism Over ‘$teyer’ Tweet, Jordan Denies”. Talking Points Memo. Archived from the original on 5 March 2019.
  • ^ Jordan, Jim. Twitter http://web.archive.org/web/20190305010212/https:/twitter.com/jim_jordan/status/1102268353492721664. Archived from the original on 5 March 2019. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  • ^ a b “Tea Party Politics: A Look Inside the Republican Suicide Machine”. Rolling Stone. Retrieved January 19, 2015.
  • ^ Meet the Democrat trying to unseat scandal-plagued Rep. Jim Jordan in his heavily Republican district Janet Garrett, Jordan’s third-time challenger, has already raised well into six-figures in Ohio,Vox, Tara Golshan, July 11, 2018. Retrieved July 18, 2018.
  • ^ “Jim Jordan (R-Ohio)”. Washington Post. 29 September 2017. Career History: … Assistant wrestling coach at Ohio State University (OSU) (1987–1995) … After graduating in 1986, Jordan returned to his home state to work as an assistant wrestling coach at OSU for nine years.
  • ^ Stankiewicz, Kevin (5 April 2018). “Ohio State investigating allegations of sexual misconduct by former wrestling team doctor”. The Lantern. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  • ^ a b c Kesling, Ben; Peterson, Kristina (5 July 2018). “Former Ohio State wrestlers say Rep. Jim Jordan knew of team doctor’s alleged misconduct”. Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on 6 July 2018. Former Ohio State wrestler Mike DiSabato has led a campaign to publicize Dr. Strauss’s alleged wrongdoings for months and only recently began to criticize Mr. Jordan for allegedly ignoring athletes’ concerns.
  • ^ Viebeck, Elise; Crites, Alice (9 July 2018). “Representative Jim Jordan returns to Washington as scrutiny over alleged sexual abuse at Ohio State intensifies”. Washington Post. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  • ^ Edmonsen, Catie. “Unshaken by Abuse Scandal, Conservatives Are Sticking With Jim Jordan”. The New York Times. Retrieved 27 July 2018.
  • ^ “Jim Jordan’s Accusers”. Jordan Scandal. Retrieved 12 July 2018.
  • ^ Viebeck, Elise; Crites, Alice. “Rep. Jim Jordan faces new accusation that he must have known about alleged sexual abuse at Ohio State”. Washington Post. Archived from the original on 8 July 2018. David Range … said Jordan had to have known about alleged sexual misconduct by Richard Strauss … because it happened regularly to team members and people talked about it.
  • ^ a b “‘A cesspool of deviancy’: New claims of voyeurism test Jordan denials”. Politico. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  • ^ “”It’s false”: Rep. Jim Jordan slams accusers amid accusations he ignored sexual abuse at Ohio State”. Washington Post. Retrieved 7 July 2018.
  • ^ “Jim Jordan is accused of turning a blind eye to Ohio State sexual abuse. Now he’s attacking the accusers”. Vox. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  • ^ Almasy, Steve; Andone, Dakin. “Ohio State team doctor was warned about being ‘too hands on’ with athletes, former coach says”. CNN. Retrieved 27 July 2018.
  • ^ “Congressman Jim Jordan blasts CNN for doing actual journalism”. Newsweek. 11 July 2018. Retrieved 12 July 2018. Congressman Jim Jordan blasts CNN for doing actual journalism
  • ^ Cite error: The named reference Strauss3 was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  • ^ “Speaker Ryan, Republicans rally around Rep. Jim Jordan amid wrestler abuse allegations”. NBC News. Retrieved 11 July 2018.
  • ^ Wehrman, Jessica (2018-08-09). “Ohio State wrestler who accused Jordan of knowing about sex abuse now recants”. dispatch.com. Retrieved 2018-08-09.
  • ^ CNN, Jean Casarez, Elizabeth Joseph and Jay Croft,. “Ex-Ohio State wrestler clarifies comment about congressman’s awareness of abuse”. CNN. Retrieved 2018-08-10.
  • ^ CNN, Jean Casarez, Elizabeth Joseph and Jay Croft,. “Ex-Ohio State wrestler clarifies comment about congressman’s awareness of abuse”. CNN. Retrieved 2018-08-10.
  • ^ Eaton, Sabrina (June 5, 2011). “U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio gains power among House conservatives”. cleveland.com. Retrieved February 28, 2019.
  • ^ “Election Results”. Ohio Secretary of State. Archived from the original on August 15, 2012. Retrieved February 28, 2014.
  • External links[edit]

    • Congressman Jim Jordan official U.S. House site
    • Jim Jordan for Congress
    • Jim Jordan at Curlie
    • Appearances on C-SPAN
    • Biography at the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
    • Profile at Vote Smart
    • Financial information (federal office) at the Federal Election Commission
    • Legislation sponsored at the Library of Congress

    Minority party

    • 116th United States Congress
    • List of acts of the 116th United States Congress


    Altered Carbon

    This article is about the 2002 novel. For the 2018 Netflix series, see Altered Carbon (TV series).

    Altered Carbon is a 2002 science fiction novel by British writer Richard K. Morgan. Set in a future in which interstellar travel is facilitated by transferring consciousnesses between bodies (“sleeves”), it follows the attempt of Takeshi Kovacs, a former U.N. elite soldier turned private investigator, to investigate a rich man’s death. It is followed by the sequels Broken Angels and Woken Furies.

    The book was adapted as a Netflix television series, also titled Altered Carbon, in 2018.[1]

    Contents

    • 1 Plot
    • 2 Reception
    • 3 Television adaptation
    • 4 References

    Plot[edit]

    In the novel’s futuristic world, human personalities can be stored digitally and downloaded into new bodies, called “sleeves”. Most people have cortical stacks in their spinal columns that store their consciousness. If their body dies, their stack can be stored indefinitely. Catholics are not, as they believe that the soul goes to Heaven when they die, and so would not pass on to the new sleeve. This makes Catholics easy targets for murder, since killers know their victim may not be re-sleeved to testify. A UN resolution to alter this legal position forms one strand of the novel’s plot, to allow the authorities to sleeve a deceased Catholic woman temporarily to testify in a murder trial.

    While most people can afford to get resleeved at the end of their lives, they are unable to update their bodies and most go through the full aging process each time, which discourages most from resleeving more than once or twice. So while normal people can live indefinitely in theory, most choose not to. Only the wealthy are able to acquire replacement bodies on a continual basis. The long-lived are called Meths, a reference to the Biblical figure Methuselah. The very rich are also able to keep copies of their minds in remote storage, which they update regularly. This ensures that even if their stack is destroyed, they can be resleeved.

    A Meth named Laurens Bancroft has, apparently, committed suicide in Bay City (formerly San Francisco[2]). When he is resleeved and his destroyed stack restored, its 48-hour back-up schedule means he has no memories of the previous two days. Convinced he was murdered, Bancroft hires Takeshi Kovacs to investigate.

    Kovacs is an ex-Envoy, a military unit formed to cope with the challenge of interstellar warfare. Faster-than-light travel is only possible by subspace transmission, called needlecasting, of a digitally stored consciousness to “download centers”[3] where resleeving into physical bodies can be carried out. Transmitting normal soldiers in this way would severely inhibit their effectiveness, since they would have to cope with a new body and an unknown environment while fighting. To combat this, Envoy training emphasises mental techniques necessary to survive in different bodies over physical strength, and the sleeve they are transmitted into has special neuro-chemical sensors that amplify the power of the five senses, intuition and physical capabilities to superhuman degrees. The effectiveness of the Envoy Corps’ training is such that Envoys are banned from holding government positions on most worlds. Kovacs is persistently wracked by his memories of the action taken by the Envoy Corps in a battle on the planet Sharya and especially by the military debacle on Innenin, in which the Corps suffered extensive casualties after their stacks were infected and driven into self-destructive insanity with Rawling 4851, a virus that corrupts digital information.

    Kovacs, killed in the novel’s prologue and stored in digital form, is downloaded into a sleeve formerly inhabited by Bay City policeman Elias Ryker. The plot unfolds through Kovacs’ narrative. Kovacs eventually solves the mystery, but only after a great deal of violence, including torture in virtual reality, which he is able to bear only because of his Envoy training.

    Reception[edit]

    Describing the book, Kirkus Reviews said that “The body count is high, the gadgetry pure genius, the sex scenes deliriously overwrought, and the worn cynicism thoroughly distasteful: a welcome return to cyberpunk’s badass roots.”[4]

    The book won the Philip K. Dick Award for Best Novel in 2003.

    Television adaptation[edit]

    Main article: Altered Carbon (TV series)

    A television adaptation was announced in 2016. An initial 10-episode season had been ordered by Netflix.[5] The first season premiered on Netflix on February 2, 2018.[6]

    Extensive and significant changes to the source material were made in the adaptation.

    For example, in the Netflix series Envoys are presented as having been trained, deployed and led by Quellcrist Falconer as part of a revolution (called “the Unsettlement”) that she leads on Harlan’s World (Kovacs’ home planet). Kovacs is shown as having been trained as an Envoy by, and serving as a revolutionary under, Falconer. The Quellist Revolution is crushed by the Protectorate (the established, inter-planetary government) in an apocalyptic assault. Kovacs, the only survivor, is presented as the last Envoy.

    By contrast, in the books, Envoys were and are the elite forces of the Protectorate (which would have been fighting against the revolution); Falconer died long before Kovacs was born; Kovacs trained as an Envoy under a different woman; and the Envoy Corps is still very much in use by the Protectorate and remains widely feared.

    The makers of the show have also chosen to expand the roles of many characters, particularly females.

    At least one of the series’s departures from the books was the result of legal issues. In the book, the hotel in which Kovacs stays while investigating Bancroft’s murder is themed after Jimi Hendrix. Since the Hendrix estate would not approve this for the Netflix series, the show was obliged to make another choice. They chose the figure of Edgar Allan Poe instead.

    On November 8, 2018, Netflix announced an animated companion series[7][8] set in the same universe and exploring new elements of the story mythology.

    References[edit]

  • ^ Hale, Mike (1 February 2018). “Review: ‘Altered Carbon,’ Netflix’s ‘Blade Runner’ Replicant” – via NYTimes.com.
  • ^ “Altered Carbon”. Penguin Random House. Retrieved 1 August 2018.
  • ^ Altered Carbon, Chapters 1-2.
  • ^ “Altered Carbon by Richard K. Morgan”. Kirkus Reviews. December 1, 2002.
  • ^ “Netflix Orders ‘Altered Carbon’ Sci-Fi Series From Laeta Kalogridis & Skydance”. Deadline. January 20, 2016. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  • ^ Hibberd, James (December 4, 2017). “Altered Carbon: First teaser trailer for stunning Netflix sci-fi series”. Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  • ^ Ramos, Dino-Ray (8 November 2018). “Netflix Unveils ‘Pacific Rim’, ‘Altered Carbon’ & More In New Lineup Of Anime Originals”. Deadline. Retrieved 8 November 2018.
  • ^ “NETFLIX UNVEILS 17 NEW ORIGINALS FROM ASIA”. Netflix Media Center. Retrieved 8 November 2018.

  • 123Movies

    Online illlegal movie streaming site network

    123Movies, GoMovies, GoStream, MeMovies or 123movieshub was a network of file streaming websites operating from Vietnam which allowed users to watch movies for free. It was called the world’s “most popular illegal site” by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) in March 2018,[4][6][7] before being shut down a few weeks later on foot of a criminal investigation by the Vietnamese authorities.[8][9] As of February 2019[update], the network is still active via clone sites.[10]

    Contents

    • 1 Development
    • 2 Shutdown
    • 3 Reappearance
    • 4 See also
    • 5 Notes
    • 6 References
    • 7 External links

    Development

    GoMovies Logo

    The site went through several name changes after being shut down from different domains; sometimes the name appeared as “123Movies”, and other times as “123movies”. The original name, and URL, was 123movies.to, which changed to other domains including 123movies.is before redirecting to gomovies.to and later gomovies.is.[2][11][12] It was changed briefly to memovies.to before changing to 123movieshub.to and remaining there until shutdown.[7][8]

    In October 2016, the MPAA listed 123Movies in its Online Notorious Markets overview to the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR), stating that: “The site has a global Alexa rank of 559 and a local rank of 386 in the U.S. 123movies.to had 9.26 million worlwide unique visitors in August 2016 according to SimilarWeb data”.[1] In October 2016, Business Insider reported that 123movies.to was the “most-used pirate website” in the United Kingdom.[13][5]

    In December 2017, the creators of 123movies launched another streaming site dedicated to anime, named AnimeHub.to.[14] It included HD, HD-RIP, Blu-ray and Camera qualities of movies. The video hosters and players it used included Openload, Streamango, and MyCloud. The site also contained banner and pop-up ads that sometimes redirected to malware, although less in quantity than many other streaming sites like FMovies. During its existance, the site was covered by TorrentFreak regarding its features, uptime/downtime, shutdown, and reasons for shutdown.[7][8][15][14][11][12][10][16]

    Shutdown

    In March 2017, TorrentFreak reported that the U.S. ambassador to Vietnam, Ted Osius, had been in talks with the local Minister of Information and Communications, Truong Minh Tuan, about shutting down illegal video streaming sites operating from Vietnam, and listed 123movies as one specific site.[17][18][19]

    In October 2017, the MPAA listed 123Movies (and GoStream.is) in its Online Notorious Markets overview to the Office of the United States Trade Representative, stating that while the site was technically hosted from the Ukraine that: “The site takes numerous steps to hide the identity of the
    operator, including using Cloudflare, but there is strong reason to believe the operator is still in Vietnam; content is uploaded using cyberlockers from numerous email accounts originating from Can Tho University of Medicine and Pharmacy”.[2][15][7]

    In March 2018, the MPAA said that the site was the “most popular illegal download site in the world”, and was operated from Vietnam and estimated that it had 98 million visitors per month.[4][6][7] On 19 March 2018, a note on the site’s home page announced its shut-down, and urged users to “respect filmmakers by paying for movies and TV-shows”.[8][9][19]

    Reappearance

    In October 2018, the MPAA’s update on Online Notorious Markets to the United States Trade Representative, said that the closure of 123movies, 123movieshub, gostream, and gomovies, on foot of a criminal investigation in Vietnam in 2018, was “an important development” in combatting illegal film piracy services. However, the MPAA report also noted that numerous copycat sites had emerged in at least eight other countries.[3][16] In November 2018 TorrentFreak reported sites connected to 123Movies like WatchAsap.com had also been shut down by the FBI, but were re-directing other file sharing sites.[10]

    See also

    • List of websites blocked in the United Kingdom
    • Putlocker, similar online movie streaming network
    • YIFY Torrents (or YTS Torrents), online movie file downloading network
    • Popcorn Time, a freeware program allowing users to watch movies through torrenting on several platforms.

    Notes

  • ^ The MPAA only first makes comment on 123Movies in its 2016 report to the USTR; it does not appear in the MPAA 2015 report to the USTR on Notorious Markets.[1] Similarly, the earliest article on TorrentFreak regarding 123Movies dates from late 2016.[5]
  • References

  • ^ a b c d Joanna McIntosh (Executive Vice President) (7 October 2016). “Letter to Christine Peterson, Director for Intellectual Property and Innovation” (PDF). Retrieved 21 February 2019. The site has a global Alexa rank of 559 and a local rank of 386 in the U.S. 123movies.to had 9.26 million worlwide unique visitors in August 2016 according to SimilarWeb data. The site is currently using a chain of reverse proxy services in the United States, Iran and Romania to curb rights holders’ ability to identify its precise host..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  • ^ a b c Charles Rivkin (CEO MPAA) (2 October 2017). “Letter to Christine Peterson, Director for Intellectual Property and Innovation” (PDF). Retrieved 21 February 2019. 123movies, now redirects to Gostream.is, the latest iteration of which is a very popular streaming website that embeds popular movie and series content from third-party cyberlockers. The site has undergone changes in 2016-2017, rebranding as gomovies in March 2017, and then the domain name registered as gostream in July 2017; it is believed this is due in part to highprofile pressure. Gostream currently has a global Alexa rank of 477 and a local rank of 170 in the U.S. Gostream (and its associated domains) garnered 18.45 million unique visitors in July 2017 according to SimilarWeb data.
  • ^ a b c Charles Rivkin (CEO MPAA) (1 October 2018). “Letter to Sung Chang, Director for Intellectual Property and Innovation” (PDF). Retrieved 21 February 2019. An important development in 2018 was the shuttering of a ring of piracy services that had operated under the names 123movies, 123movieshub, gostream, and gomovies following the launch of a criminal investigation in Vietnam and significant industry engagement. Since its closure, many copycat sites have emerged. This ring of piracy services had been blocked in at least eight countries prior to its shut down and efforts are underway to shut down the copycats as well:
  • ^ a b c An Nguyen (15 March 2018). “World’s most popular pirated movie site being run from Vietnam: US trade association”. VnExpress. Retrieved 21 February 2019. “Right now, the most popular illegal site in the world, 123movies.to (at this point), is operated from Vietnam, and has 98 million visitors a month,” said Jan van Voorn, executive vice president & chief of Global Content Protection at the MPAA.
  • ^ a b Ernsto (28 October 2016). “UK Piracy Blocklist Expands With 123movies and Other Streaming Sites”. Retrieved 22 February 2019. The 123movies.to website is by far the largest target on the list. The site is currently the most used pirate site in the UK, and attracts millions of daily visitors around the globe. While the looming blockade will result in a temporary reduction in traffic, 123movies is already anticipating such measures. The streaming portal currently features a message alerting people that they have an alternative .ru domain available that may help to bypass blockades.
  • ^ a b Dan Perez (21 March 2018). “World’s ‘most popular illegal site’ says goodbye, encourages paying for movies, shows”. International Business Times. Retrieved 21 February 2019. Speaking to VN Express, van Voorn said that the website is being operated in Vietnam and has 98 million visitors per month. The MPAA was in Vietnam for a global campaign dealing with illegal piracy sites.
  • ^ a b c d e Ernesto (16 March 2018). “MPAA Brands 123Movies as the World’s Most Popular Illegal Site”. TorrentFreak. Retrieved 2019-01-19. “Right now, the most popular illegal site in the world, 123movies.to (at this point), is operated from Vietnam, and has 98 million visitors a month,” Van Voorn said, quoted by VNExpress.
  • ^ a b c d Ernesto (19 March 2019). “Pirate Streaming Giant 123Movies Announces Shutdown”. TorrentFreak. Retrieved 21 February 2019. According to a message posted on the site, it will close its doors at the end of the week. At the same time, the operators are now urging their users to respect filmmakers by paying for movies and TV-shows.
  • ^ a b Arron Brown (22 March 2018). “World’s ‘most popular illegal site’ 123Movies SHUTS DOWN, warns users to STOP streaming”. Daily Express. Retrieved 19 February 2019.
  • ^ a b c “Is There a Mysterious Criminal Case Against WatchAsap?”. TorrentFreak. 2018-11-18. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  • ^ a b “Pirate Streaming Site 123Movies Rebrands as GoMovies (Updated)”. TorrentFreak. 2017-03-29. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  • ^ a b “GoMovies Moves to GoStream.is and Evades Google ‘Ban'”. TorrentFreak. 2017-07-14. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  • ^ James Cook (28 October 2019). “13 more illegal movie and TV streaming sites have been blocked in the UK”. Business Insider. Retrieved 21 February 2019. TorrentFreak points out that 123movies.to, one of the newly blocked sites, is actually the most-used pirate website in the UK.
  • ^ a b “GoMovies/123Movies Launches Anime Streaming Site”. TorrentFreak. 2017-12-04. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  • ^ a b Ernesto (1 April 2018). “Why Did The World’s Largest Streaming Site Suddenly Shut Down?”. TorrentFreak’. Retrieved 19 February 2019.
  • ^ a b “123movies Was Shut Down Following a Criminal Investigation”. TorrentFreak. 2018-10-05. Retrieved 2019-01-19.
  • ^ “US Ambassador Asks Vietnam to Target 123movies, Putlocker and Kisscartoon”. TorrentFreak. 23 March 2017. Retrieved 21 February 2019.
  • ^ “[TRANSLATED] Vietnam – US cooperates to block bad content on YouTube and Facebook”. VnExpress. 22 March 2017. Retrieved 21 February 2019.
  • ^ a b Matthew Dunn. “123movies shuts down: Streaming giant warns users to stop piracy”. news.com.au. Retrieved 2019-01-19. 123movies has previously attracted the attention of the office of the US Trade Representative, having been listed in its latest Notorious Markets report which highlights markets engaging in and facilitating substantial copyright piracy and trademark counterfeiting. Last year the US Ambassador to Vietnam also requested the local Government criminally prosecute 123movies and other piracy sites running from the country.
  • External links

    • MPAA Research on Notorious Markets

    Paid

    • Acorn TV
    • AnimeLab
    • BritBox
    • CBS All Access
    • Crave
    • Crunchyroll
    • CuriosityStream
    • DC Universe
    • Disney+
    • Epix Now
    • Fandor
    • The Film Detective
    • Fullscreen
    • HBO Now
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    • HOOQ
    • Hulu
    • Icflix
    • Iflix
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    • Sky On Demand
    • Stan
    • STARZ
    • VidAngel
    • The Filipino Channel
    • WatchToku
    • YouTube Premium

    Discontinued

    • Azubu
    • BBC Store
    • Blip
    • BlogTV
    • CinemaNow
    • Daisuki
    • DramaFever
    • Fearnet
    • FilmStruck
    • Flixster
    • Google Video
    • Hitbox.tv
    • imeem
    • iMesh
    • Intel AppUp
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    • Kazaa
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    • MUZU.TV
    • Nintendo Channel
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    • Sony Entertainment Network
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    List of True Detective episodes

    True Detective is an American anthology crime drama television series created and written by Nic Pizzolatto, that premiered on January 12, 2014, on HBO. The series focuses on police investigations and on the effect they have on troubled detectives that carry them out. Each season is structured as a self-contained narrative with different sets of characters and settings, and consists of eight episodes that have been between 54 and 87 minutes in length. As of February 24, 2019,[update] 24 episodes of True Detective have aired, concluding the third season.

    Contents

    • 1 Series overview
    • 2 Episodes
      • 2.1 Season 1 (2014)
      • 2.2 Season 2 (2015)
      • 2.3 Season 3 (2019)
    • 3 References
    • 4 External links

    Series overview[edit]

    Episodes[edit]

    Season 1 (2014)[edit]

    Main article: True Detective (season 1)

    In 2012, two former homicide investigators with the Louisiana State Police’s Criminal Investigations Division, Rustin “Rust” Cohle (Matthew McConaughey) and Martin “Marty” Hart (Woody Harrelson), are summoned for questioning by detectives Maynard Gilbough (Michael Potts) and Thomas Papania (Tory Kittles), about the Dora Lange murder investigation of 1995; they have not seen nor spoken to each other since an altercation concerning Martin’s wife Maggie Hart (Michelle Monaghan) over a decade prior. With many of the old files destroyed in Hurricane Rita, the two men are asked to recount the history of their working relationship, personal lives, and the Dora Lange murder investigation, as well as a series of other related individual cases as new evidence suggests that the perpetrator remains at large.

    Season 2 (2015)[edit]

    Main article: True Detective (season 2)

    California Highway Patrol officer Paul Woodrugh (Taylor Kitsch) discovers the dead body of a city manager who was involved in a major land deal. Given the ambiguous jurisdictional nature of the crime scene, two other officers, Vinci Police Department Detective Raymond Velcoro (Colin Farrell) and Ventura County Sheriff’s Office CID Antigone “Ani” Bezzerides (Rachel McAdams), along with Woodrugh are assigned to investigate the murder. The crime soon involves Frank Semyon (Vince Vaughn), a career criminal who was involved in the land deal and whose life savings were stolen when the murder took place. The three detectives, plus Semyon, quickly realize a larger conspiracy at play involving the victim’s ties to the city of Vinci’s deepening corrupt proliferations.

    Season 3 (2019)[edit]

    Main article: True Detective (season 3)

    The story takes place in the Ozarks over three separate time periods. In 1980, partner detectives Wayne Hays (Mahershala Ali) and Roland West (Stephen Dorff) investigate a macabre crime involving two missing children. In 1990, Hays and West are subpoenaed after a major break in the case. In 2015, a retired Hays is asked by a true crime documentary producer to look back at the unsolved case.[19]

    References[edit]

  • ^ “True Detective: Season One Ratings”. TV Series Finale. March 12, 2014. Retrieved December 2, 2014..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  • ^ Kissell, Rick (August 11, 2015). “‘True Detective’ Ratings Surge in Finale, But Down 22% From Last Year”. Variety. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  • ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (January 14, 2014). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘Real Housewives of Atlanta’ Wins Night, ‘True Detective’, ‘Ax Men’, ‘Shameless’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on November 4, 2015.
  • ^ Bibel, Sara (January 22, 2014). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘Real Housewives of Atlanta’ Wins Night, ‘Keeping Up With the Kardashians’, ‘Shameless’, ‘True Detective’, ‘Girls’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on November 4, 2015.
  • ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (January 28, 2014). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘Real Housewives of Atlanta’ Wins Night + ‘Live From the Red Carpet’, ‘Curse of Oak Island’, ‘Sister Wives’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on November 4, 2015.
  • ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (July 17, 2015). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘The Walking Dead’ Tops Night + ‘Real Housewives of Atlanta’, ‘Keeping Up With the Kardashians’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on November 4, 2015.
  • ^ Bibel, Sara (July 17, 2015). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘The Walking Dead’ Wins Night, NBA All Star Game, ‘Real Housewives of Atlanta’, ‘True Detective’, ‘Shameless’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on November 4, 2015.
  • ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (February 25, 2014). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘The Walking Dead’ Wins Night, + ‘Talking Dead’, ‘Real Housewives of Atlanta’, ‘True Detective’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on November 4, 2015.
  • ^ Bibel, Sara (March 4, 2014). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘The Walking Dead’ Wins Night, ‘Talking Dead’, ‘True Detective’, Oscars Red Carpet, ‘Girls’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on November 4, 2015.
  • ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (March 11, 2014). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘The Walking Dead’ Wins Night, ‘Talking Dead’, ‘The Real Housewives of Atlanta’, ‘True Detective’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Archived from the original on November 4, 2015.
  • ^ Bibel, Sara (June 23, 2015). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘True Detective’ Wins Night, ‘Ballers’, ‘Naked and Afraid’, ‘The Last Ship’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Retrieved June 23, 2015.
  • ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (June 30, 2015). “Sunday Cable Ratings: BET Awards Tops Night + ‘True Detective’, ‘Ballers’, ‘Naked and Afraid’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  • ^ Bibel, Sara (July 8, 2015). “Sunday Cable Ratings: Shark Week Wins Night, ‘True Detective’, ‘ Ballers’, ‘The Last Ship’, ‘Botched’, ‘Falling Skies’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Retrieved July 8, 2015.
  • ^ Bibel, Sara (July 14, 2015). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘Naked and Afraid XL’ Wins Night, ‘True Detective’, ‘Basketball Wives’, ‘Ballers’, ‘The Strain’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Retrieved July 14, 2015.
  • ^ Bibel, Sara (July 21, 2015). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘Naked and Afraid XL’ Wins Night, ‘True Detective’, ‘Ballers’, ‘The Strain’, ‘The Last Ship’, ‘Tut’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Retrieved July 21, 2015.
  • ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (July 28, 2015). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘I am Cait’ Tops Night + ‘Naked & Afraid XL’, ‘Rick & Morty’, ‘True Detective’, NASCAR, ‘Ballers’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Retrieved July 28, 2015.
  • ^ Bibel, Sara (August 4, 2015). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘Rick and Morty’ & ‘Naked and Afraid XL’, Win Night, ‘True Detective’, ‘The Last Ship’, ‘Ballers’, ‘The Strain’, ‘Ray Donovan’ & More”. TV by the Numbers. Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  • ^ Kondolojy, Amanda (August 11, 2015). “Sunday Cable Ratings: ‘True Detective’ Tops Night + ‘Naked and Afraid XL’, ‘Rick & Morty’, ‘Ballers’, & More”. TV by the Numbers. Retrieved August 11, 2015.
  • ^ “Starring Mahershala Ali and Created by Nic Pizzolatto, “True Detective” Returns for Third Season Jan. 13, Exclusively on HBO”. TheFutonCritic.com. December 12, 2018. Retrieved December 13, 2018.
  • ^ a b Metcalf, Mitch (January 15, 2019). “Updated: ShowBuzzDaily’s Top 150 Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 1.13.2019”. Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  • ^ Metcalf, Mitch (January 23, 2019). “Updated: ShowBuzzDaily’s Top 150 Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 1.20.2019”. Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  • ^ Metcalf, Mitch (January 29, 2019). “Updated: ShowBuzzDaily’s Top 150 Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 1.27.2019”. Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved January 29, 2019.
  • ^ Metcalf, Mitch (February 5, 2019). “Updated: ShowBuzzDaily’s Top 150 Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 2.3.2019”. Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved February 7, 2019.
  • ^ Metcalf, Mitch (February 12, 2019). “Updated: ShowBuzzDaily’s Top 150 Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 2.10.2019”. Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved February 13, 2019.
  • ^ Metcalf, Mitch (February 20, 2019). “Updated: ShowBuzzDaily’s Top 150 Sunday Cable Originals & Network Finals: 2.17.2019”. Showbuzz Daily. Retrieved February 20, 2019.
  • External links[edit]

    • Official website
    • List of True Detective episodes on IMDb
    • List of True Detective episodes at TV.com


    National Investigation Agency

    National Investigation Agency (NIA) is a central agency established by the Indian Government to combat terror in India.[3] It acts as the Central Counter Terrorism Law Enforcement Agency. The agency is empowered to deal with terror related crimes across states without special permission from the states. The Agency came into existence with the enactment of the National Investigation Agency Act 2008 by the Parliament of India on 31 December 2008.[4][5][6][7]

    NIA was created after the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks as need for a central agency to combat terrorism was realised. The conviction rate of this anti-terrorism agency is currently 95 per cent as it has managed to convict 167 accused in the 185 cases registered by it since its inception.[8]

    NIA headquarters in New Delhi

    The founding Director-General of NIA was Radha Vinod Raju, and he served till 31 January 2010. He was succeeded by Sharad Chandra Sinha[9][10] till March 2013. In July 2013, Sharad Kumar was appointed as the Chief of National Investigation Agency. In 2017, Y.C.Modi was named as Chief of NIA in September.[11]

    Contents

    • 1 Bill
    • 2 Vision
    • 3 Jurisdiction
    • 4 Special NIA Courts
    • 5 Recent success of NIA
    • 6 See also
    • 7 References
    • 8 External links

    Bill[edit]

    A Bill for the formation of the National Investigation Agency was passed by Parliament in December 2008. As per the Bill, NIA has concurrent jurisdiction which empowers the Central Agency to probe terror attacks in any part of the country, covering offences, including challenge to the country’s sovereignty and integrity, bomb blasts, hijacking of aircraft and ships, attacks on nuclear installations. The amendments to the NIA Act has brought the offences relating to the smuggling in High-Quality Counterfeit Indian Currency under the definition of a terrorist Act aimed at damaging the monetary stability of the country and therefore can be investigated by the NIA.

    The ground staff of the agency in the national capital could be drawn from existing central staff and security organisations while in the states, permanent deputation from the state police could be taken.

    The National Investigative Agency Bill and Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Amendment Bill on Tuesday, 30 Dec 2008, became a law as President Pratibha Patil gave her assent to the legislation which was passed in the last session of Parliament.

    Vision[edit]

    Agency aims to be a thoroughly professional investigative agency matching the best international standards. It aims to set the standards of excellence in counter terrorism and other national security related investigations at the national level by developing into a highly trained, partnership oriented workforce. It also aims at creating deterrence for existing and potential terrorist groups/individuals. It aims to develop as a storehouse of all terrorist related information.[12]

    Jurisdiction[edit]

    The Agency has been empowered to conduct investigation and prosecution of offences under the Acts specified in the Schedule of the NIA Act.[13] A State Government may request the Central Government to hand over the investigation of a case to the NIA, provided the case has been registered for the offences as contained in the schedule to the NIA Act. Central Government can also order NIA to take over investigation of any scheduled offense anywhere in the India. Officers of the NIA who are drawn from the Indian Revenue Service, Indian Police Service, state police, Income Tax as well as officers from the Central Armed Police Forces, have all powers, privileges and liabilities which the police officers have in connection with investigation of any offense.[14]

    On 2016 Home minister Rajnath Singh wanted to end the central agency’s dependence on approval from state police chiefs before confiscating or attaching assets of people accused of crime.[15]

    Special NIA Courts[edit]

    Various Special Courts have been notified by the Central Government of India for trial of the cases registered at various police stations of NIA under Section 11 and 22 of the NIA Act 2008. Any question as to the jurisdiction of these courts is decided by the Central Government. These are presided over by a judge appointed by the Central Government on the recommendation of the Chief Justice of the High Court with jurisdiction in that region. Supreme Court of India has also been empowered to transfer the cases from one special court to any other special court within or outside the state if the same is in the interest of justice in light of the prevailing circumstances in any particular state. The NIA Special Courts are empowered with all powers of the court of sessions under Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 for trial of any offense.[13]

    Trial by this courts are held on day-to-day basis on all working days and have precedence over the trial of any other case against the accused in any other court (not being a Special Court) and have to be concluded in preference to the trial of such other case. An appeal from any judgement, sentence or order, not being an interlocutory order, of a Special Court lies to the High Court both on facts and on law. Such an appeal can be heard by a division bench of two Judges of the High Court. At present there are 38 Special NIA Courts.[16] State Governments have also been empowered to appoint one or more such special courts in their states.[13]

    Recent success of NIA[edit]

    In year 2012, NIA with the assistance of Interpol and Saudi Intelligence agencies has successfully arrested terrorists namely: Abu Jundal alias Abu Hamza, (Pakistani national), Fasih Mohammad and Yaseen Bhatkal (Indian Mujahideen). Yaseen Bhatkal was arrested and chargesheeted by the investigating officer Vikas Vaibhav.[17]

    In the year 2013, NIA was successful in arresting two senior members of Indian Mujahideen, namely Ahmed Siddibappa Zaraar alias Yasin Bhatkal and Asadullah Akhtar alias Haddi, from Indo Nepal border in Bihar on 29 August 2013. These two were instrumental in the commission of a number of terrorist attacks across the country for the past several years, under the banner of Indian Mujahideen, a proscribed terrorist organisation.

    It has identified two Naxalite commanders in Bastar who were part of the ambush that killed almost the entire Congress’ Chhattisgarh top brass.[18]

    In 2014 NIA investigators began probing the conspiracy of Jamaat-Ul-Mujahideen Bangladesh (JMB) a proscribed terrorist organisation in Bangladesh, which was conspiring to spread its terror network in Indian states of West Bengal, Assam and Jharkhand. The terrorist conspiracy in India aimed at recruitment, radicalisation and training of vulnerable Indian youths in violent Jihadist ideology and terrorist acts, collection of funds for the organisational activities in India and training them in fabrication and use of Improvised explosive devices (IED’s) and firearms for terrorist acts. NIA has arrested 20 persons in the case so far and 27 accused have been charged so far for their role in the conspiracy, including 5 Bangladeshi nationals. NIA is actively seeking and receiving cooperation from the Bangladeshi Government and law enforcement agencies in the ongoing investigations.

    NIA has been active in the war against terror in Jammu and Kashmir. On January 18, 2018, NIA filed a chargesheet against 12 people including Lashkar-e-Taiba terror group chief Hafiz Saeed and Hizbul Mujahideen chief Syed Salahuddin.[19][20] This chargesheet was filed after nearly eight months of investigations spanning six states in India during which over 300 witnesses were examined, 950 “incriminating documents” and 600 electronic devices were seized.[21] NIA has also stated that the war against terror in Kashmir is not about terror funding alone, it’s about a conspiracy to wage war against India.[22] During the investigation the NIA has arrested people allegedly involved in stone-pelting incidents for the first time including Kashmiri photojournalist Kamran Yusuf.[23][24][25]

    See also[edit]

    • NIA Most Wanted

    References[edit]

  • ^ NIA officer Mohammed Tanzil shot dead as children watched “Ahmad, who has been with the NIA ever since the organisation was formed in February 2009…”
  • ^ a b With shoe-string budget, NIA poorly equipped for counterterrorism |date=2014-11-07 |accessdate=2016-07-25
  • ^ “NIA to have new HQ complex on Tuesday”..mw-parser-output cite.citation{font-style:inherit}.mw-parser-output .citation q{quotes:”””””””‘””‘”}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration{color:#555}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}.mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a{background:url(“//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png”)no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center}.mw-parser-output code.cs1-code{color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit}.mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error{display:none;font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error{font-size:100%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-maint{display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format{font-size:95%}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left{padding-left:0.2em}.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right{padding-right:0.2em}
  • ^ “National Investigation Agency: About Us”. National Investigation Agency. Retrieved 16 June 2013.
  • ^ TNN 16 Dec 2008, 12.04am IST (2008-12-16). “Finally, govt clears central terror agency, tougher laws”. Articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com. Retrieved 2013-09-28.
  • ^ “Cabinet clears bill to set up federal probe agency”. Ndtv.com. Archived from the original on 8 May 2013. Retrieved 9 December 2012.
  • ^ PTI 16 Dec 2008, 07.40pm IST (2008-12-16). “Govt tables bill to set up National Investigation Agency”. Articles.timesofindia.indiatimes.com. Retrieved 2013-09-28.
  • ^ “Our conviction rate is 95%: NIA DG YC Modi”. 2018-01-24. Retrieved 2018-01-28.
  • ^ “Sharad Chandra Sinha new NIA chief”. Deccan Herald. February 2010. Retrieved 11 July 2013.
  • ^ “S.C. Sinha- Appointed Director General of NIA”. Jagranjosh.com. Retrieved 2012-12-09.
  • ^ “Y.C. Modi appointed NIA chief”. The Hindu. Special Correspondent. 2017-09-18. ISSN 0971-751X. Retrieved 2018-01-28.
  • ^ “Vision and Mission”. National Investigation Agency. Retrieved 2012-12-09.
  • ^ a b c “National Investigation Agency Act 2008” (PDF). National Investigation Agency. Retrieved 16 June 2013.
  • ^ “Frequently Asked Questions”. National Investigation Agency. Retrieved 16 June 2013.
  • ^ Tikku, Aloke (22 Dec 2016). “Govt wants more power for NIA, move could eat into states’ rights 00:29 IST”. Hindustan Times. Archived from the original on 8 Feb 2019. Retrieved 8 Feb 2019.
  • ^ “National Investigation Agency – Courts”.
  • ^ “Saudi sends IM terror suspect back to India”. Hindustan Times. Archived from the original on 13 May 2013. Retrieved 28 September 2013.
  • ^ “NIA cracks Bastar ambush case as Naxal Usendi Sings”. The Economic Times. 24 January 2014. Retrieved 24 January 2014.
  • ^ “National Investigation Agency charges LeT chief Hafiz Saeed with sedition”. The New Indian Express. Retrieved 2018-01-28.
  • ^ “Kashmir terror funding: NIA files chargesheet against 12 people, including Hafiz Saeed and Syed Salahuddin – Firstpost”. www.firstpost.com. Retrieved 2018-01-28.
  • ^ “NIA files chargesheet in Kashmir terror funding case: Shrinking influence of separatists opens up opportunity for dialogue – Firstpost”. www.firstpost.com. Retrieved 2018-01-28.
  • ^ “Pakistan Embassy Officials Involved In Kashmir Terror Funding: NIA”. NDTV.com. Retrieved 2018-01-28.
  • ^ “Journalists protest in Srinagar after Kamran Yousuf’s arrest by NIA”. The Indian Express. 2017-09-07. Retrieved 2018-01-29.
  • ^ “Terror funding case: Kashmir freelance photo-journalist amongst 2 arrested for stone-pelting”. India Today. 2017-09-05. Retrieved 2018-01-29.
  • ^ “India charges photojournalist arrested in Kashmir in September with sedition, other crimes”. cpj.org. Retrieved 2018-01-29.
  • External links[edit]

    • Official website
    • NIA act


    Jussie Smollett

    American actor

    Jussie Smollett[4] (/ˈdʒʌsi smʌˈlɛt/ JUSS-ee (born June 21, 1982)[5] is an American actor, singer, director and photographer. He began his career as a child actor in 1987 starring in commercials and films, including The Mighty Ducks (1992) and Rob Reiner’s North (1994). In 2015, Smollett attracted international attention and received a highly positive critical reception for his portrayal of musician Jamal Lyon in the Fox drama series Empire (2015). Smollett has also appeared in Ridley Scott’s science fiction film Alien: Covenant (2017) as Ricks and in Marshall (2017) as Langston Hughes.

    In 2019, Smollett alleged he was assaulted in a hate crime. The subsequent investigation by the Chicago Police Department led police to shift the focus of the investigation, with some unnamed police sources alleging Smollett staged the attack.[6][7][8]

    Contents

    • 1 Early life
    • 2 Career
    • 3 Personal life
    • 4 2019 Chicago incident
    • 5 Filmography
      • 5.1 Film
      • 5.2 Television
      • 5.3 Music videos
    • 6 Awards and nominations
    • 7 Discography
      • 7.1 Albums
      • 7.2 Singles
    • 8 Notes
    • 9 References
    • 10 External links

    Early life

    Justin “Jussie” Smollett was born [9] in Santa Rosa, California, and is the third of six children born to Janet (née Harris) and Joel Smollett.[10] He has three brothers and two sisters: Jake, Jocqui, Jojo, Jurnee, and Jazz, several of whom are also actors.[11] Smollett is biracial.[12] His father was Jewish (his family emigrated from Russia and Poland). Smollett’s mother is African-American.[13] He graduated from Paramus Catholic High School in Paramus, New Jersey.[14]

    Career

    Smollett at the 2016 PaleyFest.

    Smollett began his acting career as a child, appearing in the films The Mighty Ducks (1992) and Rob Reiner’s North (1994). On television, he starred alongside his five real-life siblings in the short-lived ABC sitcom On Our Own from 1994–95.[15] In 2012, Smollett returned to acting with the leading role in Patrik-Ian Polk’s LGBT-themed comedy-drama The Skinny.[16] Also that year, he released an EP album titled The Poisoned Hearts Club.[11][17] He later guest-starred on The Mindy Project (2012) and Revenge (2014).

    In 2014, Smollett was cast as Jamal Lyon—a gay musician who struggles to gain his father’s approval—opposite Taraji P. Henson and Terrence Howard in the Fox drama series Empire.[18][19][20] His role was hailed as “groundbreaking” for its positive depiction of a black gay man on television.[21] Smollett reprised his role in subsequent seasons,[22] and directed an episode of the fourth season in 2017.[23]

    In February 2015, Smollett confirmed that he had signed a recording contract with Columbia Records and would be releasing an album in the future.[24] Smollett co-wrote the songs “I Wanna Love You” and “You’re So Beautiful” on the Original Soundtrack from Season 1 of Empire album, which was released in March 2015.[25]

    In June 2015, it was announced that Smollett would guest-star alongside his younger sister, Jurnee, on Underground, which aired in 2016.[26]

    Personal life

    Smollett came out as gay during a televised interview with Ellen DeGeneres in March 2015.[27][28]

    In a 2016 interview with Out magazine, Smollett clarified his sexual orientation by stating “If I had to label myself, I would label myself as a gay man.” However, he stated his belief that openness to love is more important than gender, revealing that “If I fall in love down the road with a woman, I’m going to love that woman.”[29] As a boy, Smollett had some romantic interest in girls.[30] When Smollett’s gay character Jamal Lyon from Empire engaged in a tryst with a female character, Smollett defended the plot development by stating that he and Empire creator Lee Daniels were trying to create a conversation about sexual fluidity in the gay community. Daniels has stated that “Jussie and I both share the same feeling that, yes, even though we are gay, we’re sexual human beings. And we do occasionally want to sleep with a woman.” Daniels stated that “We’re showing life on Empire”, in that both he and Smollett were incorporating their own sexual fluidity as gay men into Empire.[31]

    2019 Chicago incident

    On January 29, 2019, Smollett alleged that he was attacked in the 300 block of East Lower North Water Street in Chicago’s Streeterville neighborhood,[32] in what was initially investigated as a hate crime.[33][34] Unnamed police sources later alleged Smollett orchestrated the attack.[35]

    Smollett told police that he was attacked outside his apartment building by two white men in ski masks who made racial and homophobic slurs, and said “This is MAGA country,” referencing President Donald Trump’s slogan “Make America Great Again”[33] and used their hands, feet, and teeth as weapons in the assault.[36][37] According to a statement released by the Chicago Police Department, the two suspects then “poured an unknown liquid” on Smollett and put a noose around his neck.[38] Smollett said that he fought them off. Smollett was admitted to Northwestern Memorial Hospital; not seriously injured, he was released “in good condition” later that morning.[33][39][40] The police were called after 2:30 AM;[41] when they arrived around 2:40 AM, Smollett had a white rope around his neck.[42]

    On January 30, before Smollett’s story was called into question by the police, some public figures expressed support for Smollett on social media.[34][43] Entertainment industry figures, including Shonda Rhimes and Viola Davis, tweeted their outrage and support.[43] Democratic senators and presidential candidates Kamala Harris and Cory Booker both described the attack as a modern-day lynching,[44] with Booker urging Congress to pass the federal Anti-Lynching Bill he and Harris have co-sponsored.[43][45] In an interview with April Ryan of AURN, President Trump was asked about Smollett being attacked and said, “I think that’s horrible. It doesn’t get worse.”[46] Smollett faced skepticism regarding his claim of being attacked; he responded to this skepticism by saying that he believed that, if he had said his attackers were Mexicans, Muslims or black people, “the doubters would have supported me much more… And that says a lot about the place that we are in our country right now.”[47]

    On February 13, Chicago Police raided the home of two “persons of interest” in the case. The men are brothers, of Nigerian descent, who have acted as extras on Empire. Police recovered bleach and other items from the home.[48] The brothers were held in police custody on suspicion of battery but were not charged.[49] According to the brothers’ attorney, they know Smollett from working on the show, and have also spent time with him at a gym.[49] The two Nigerian men were released February 15 without being charged with a crime,[50][51] with Chicago Police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi stating their release was “due to new evidence” from the interrogations.[50]

    Chicago Police later told ABC News: “Police are investigating whether the two individuals committed the attack—or whether the attack happened at all.”[52] On February 16, two unnamed Chicago police sources informed CNN that Chicago police had discovered evidence indicating that Smollett had paid the two Nigerian brothers $3,500 to stage the attack.[53][54] Financial records indicate that the brothers purchased the rope found around Smollett’s neck at Crafty Beaver Hardware Store in Ravenswood over the weekend of January 25.[55][56] Chicago Police have reached out to Smollett’s attorney regarding additional questioning.[49]
    Smollett has hired crisis manager Chris Bastardi to represent him.[57] Upcoming episodes of Empire have been rewritten to reduce Smollett’s role.[58]

    Filmography

    Film

    Television

    Music videos

    Awards and nominations

    Discography

    Albums

    Singles

    Notes

  • ^ “Good Enough” did not enter the Billboard
    Hot 100 chart, but peaked at number 6 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 chart.[77]
  • ^ “No Apologies” did not enter the Billboard
    Hot 100 chart, but peaked at number 23 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 chart.[77]
  • ^ “I Wanna Love You” did not enter the Billboard
    Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number 7 on the Bubbling Under Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart.[79]
  • ^ “Money For Nothing” did not enter the Billboard
    Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number 9 on the Bubbling Under Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart.[79]
  • ^ “Nothing To Lose” did not enter the Billboard
    Hot 100 chart, but peaked at number 21 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 chart.[77]
  • ^ “Powerful” did not enter the Billboard
    Hot 100 chart, but peaked at number 12 on the Bubbling Under Hot 100 chart.[77]
  • ^ “Chasing the Sky” did not enter the Billboard
    Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number 2 on the Bubbling Under Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart.[79]
  • ^ “Good People” did not enter the Billboard
    Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, but peaked at number 3 on the Bubbling Under Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart.[79]
  • References

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  • External links

    • Jussie Smollett on IMDb